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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Shed Project, not sure if it's worth repairing, what do you think? Florida's sun hits it's front all day, high humidity.
I may be able to fix the doors but not sure since one is bent at the top: remove hardware, replace the rusted ones, sand off old paint, prime and paint with 100% acrylic paint. Should I try to use the same hardware screw holes or need to make new ones?
The panels are badly rotten, thinking on getting LP Smart panels, I think the existing ones may be T1-11.
Replace roof shingles and damaged soffit and fascia.
Replace rotten trim. I've seen woodpeckers pecking on the trim where it has the holes, I guess looking for insects, I'm fearing Termites or Carpenter ants.
Will you remove or just trim the pine tree? It looks like it's protecting it as that side is in best shape.
The neighbor's tree branch falling over the pine tree will be removed. My neighbor's trees have brought Jadera bugs which are now using my shed as their home.
Sounds like building a new shed! :icon_rolleyes:
I believe the prior homeowner built it in 2000, the concrete slab is 10'5" x 9'.
 

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Big Dog
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If the framing is solid, I would just replace the siding using PT T-111, doors and the fascias.

Unless it is secured to a slab, I would also try to at least raise it onto 4x4 skids to keep it out of water when it rains.

If the framing is shot, rebuild it from scratch. Again I suggest you raise off the ground using either skids or pier blocks and PT lumber for joists and floor and PT T-111 for siding.
 

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retired framer
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The problem is the siding only, never has enough nails to hold it square. It looks well worth saving but that needs a plan to follow so it doesn't fall down while you do it.


First step is to access the framing with an awl, ice pick or sharp screw driver.
Poke at the framing inside. You will soon learn the difference between good lumber and soft lumber.
If you find soft lumber around the floor and up the studs, mark the height where they are good and report what you find.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If the framing is solid, I would just replace the siding using PT T-111, doors and the fascias.

Unless it is secured to a slab, I would also try to at least raise it onto 4x4 skids to keep it out of water when it rains.

If the framing is shot, rebuild it from scratch. Again I suggest you raise off the ground using either skids or pier blocks and PT lumber for joists and floor and PT T-111 for siding.
Thanks for your reply!
I use this shed for yard tools but primarily to keep my riding lawn mower. The slab serves as the floor so I don't think I can elevate the shed that way. Maybe adding more concrete to make the slab higher? This will require a longer ramp for the mower.
The rain water usually keeps running, there's no standing water unless there a lot of heavy rain and last year we got tons of it.
It's still dry and looking good inside, for now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The problem is the siding only, never has enough nails to hold it square. It looks well worth saving but that needs a plan to follow so it doesn't fall down while you do it.


First step is to access the framing with an awl, ice pick or sharp screw driver.
Poke at the framing inside. You will soon learn the difference between good lumber and soft lumber.
If you find soft lumber around the floor and up the studs, mark the height where they are good and report what you find.
Thank you, Nealtw.
If you look on the additional pics, the second link shows the wood is rotten, has expanded, and is breaking apart. It is soft in many places.
This pics also: https://imgur.com/bWqI85c
Do you think I could replace only the soft parts on the bottom?
Can I do the same with the 2 x 4 trims?
 

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retired framer
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Thank you, Nealtw.
If you look on the additional pics, the second link shows the wood is rotten, has expanded, and is breaking apart. It is soft in many places.
This pics also: https://imgur.com/bWqI85c
Do you think I could replace only the soft parts on the bottom?
Can I do the same with the 2 x 4 trims?

I am suffering with slow connections today and can only see the pictures in your first post.


If nothing else you would work at saving the roof as that is the hardest to build and the most expensive to replace.
So the first step would be to take inventory on what is good and what is bad, then you straighten it up and go from there.
I see the rot at the fascia, you have to get in and see how deep it is but what ever you find it can likely be fixed.
 

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Usually Confused
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No photos of the framing. Also, I see soffit vents to let air in but no gable or roof vent to let it out.
I had a similar conundrum. My slab was poured at grade (actually below on one side) then the siding was run right to the ground, perfect for wicking up moisture. It had been there for about 15 years before I got to it and about a quarter of the studs were shot, although at least the sill plate was sound (PT with a gasket). Rather than trying to raise the framing, I ringed the base with 2x8 PT topped with flashing then the siding above than. I also dug a gravel filled trench (was are very sandy so good drainage), but I figured if the bottom PT does rot I can simply replace it.


As Neal mentions, don't take all of the siding off at once or the framing will loose its lateral rigidity and want to wrack - it's top heavy with the roof still on.
 

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It looks to me like the rot on the siding is all within the lower half. It also looks like there's a "rim" of siding along the bottom with some Z-bar flashing. I actually have a shed in similar condition and have been pondering. My plan is currently:

1) Take my circular saw and set its depth to the thickness of the siding.
2) Mark a line across the top of the rot and rip it with the saw, then remove the rotted part below.
3) Slip some Z-bar along the bottom of the cut (maybe use some kind of chemical treatment on the cut too).
4) Rip some new siding the height of the rotten part.
5) Nail the new siding to the framing.

Basically put in a new "skirt" of siding. It may look a bit sketchy, but it'll be functional.
 

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If you go the repair route it would be worthwhile to do the bottom 6" in PVC lumber. Little spendy,but any siding that low to the ground will continue to rot
Just put the PVC board on,and a piece of z flashing over it and continue your siding above it.
 

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Depends on how much work you want to do. If bottom plates are rotting, you can nail/screw on 2x6 or wider lumber to the sides of the studs to keep them together. Bottom plates aren't absolute. Screw on heavy metal angles for corners.

It also looks like the siding can be left on and just bottom 2' cut out and replaced. Paint the edges and use the z flashing between splices. While you have the siding off, you can cut off rotten parts of the stud (keep the side plates 2-3" off the bottom) if you want. Keeping the rotten bottom plate and studs will not matter. It would slowly settle but, again, if you can live with it, I think the shed can be kept with minimum repairs.
 

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Just my opinion.

I would tear it down.

Cut the tree down.

Build a bigger shed with vinyl siding and a garage door.

Maybe even use one side as a shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
No photos of the framing. Also, I see soffit vents to let air in but no gable or roof vent to let it out.
I had a similar conundrum. My slab was poured at grade (actually below on one side) then the siding was run right to the ground, perfect for wicking up moisture. It had been there for about 15 years before I got to it and about a quarter of the studs were shot, although at least the sill plate was sound (PT with a gasket). Rather than trying to raise the framing, I ringed the base with 2x8 PT topped with flashing then the siding above than. I also dug a gravel filled trench (was are very sandy so good drainage), but I figured if the bottom PT does rot I can simply replace it.


As Neal mentions, don't take all of the siding off at once or the framing will loose its lateral rigidity and want to wrack - it's top heavy with the roof still on.
Thank you, lenaitch.
No, there's no roof vent. Wondering what will be the easiest way to add one and if needed.
I'm just learning about this and don't know all the language about PT with a gasket or 2x8 PT topped with flashing, but I appreciate your feedback.
 

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Usually Confused
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Thank you, lenaitch.
No, there's no roof vent. Wondering what will be the easiest way to add one and if needed.
I'm just learning about this and don't know all the language about PT with a gasket or 2x8 PT topped with flashing, but I appreciate your feedback.

With your roof I think the easiest would be to cut in a simple passive roof vent - just to let the heat out.
PT = pressure treated lumber. The "gasket" is a thin layer of cell foam that is laid between the concrete floor and the bottom sill of the wall framing. It prevents moisture from wicking up from the concrete into the wood. If it isn't already there, there's no much you can do. Flashing is formed (usually) aluminum that gets tacked to the studs and acts as cap for wood underneath to direct water and a separator from the siding above. Available at most yards, sized to whatever thickness of wood you are capping. When I did mine, I used paint stir sticks as spacers to keep the siding a bit off the flashing (3/32" maybe?).



 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
With your roof I think the easiest would be to cut in a simple passive roof vent - just to let the heat out.
PT = pressure treated lumber. The "gasket" is a thin layer of cell foam that is laid between the concrete floor and the bottom sill of the wall framing. It prevents moisture from wicking up from the concrete into the wood. If it isn't already there, there's no much you can do. Flashing is formed (usually) aluminum that gets tacked to the studs and acts as cap for wood underneath to direct water and a separator from the siding above. Available at most yards, sized to whatever thickness of wood you are capping. When I did mine, I used paint stir sticks as spacers to keep the siding a bit off the flashing (3/32" maybe?).




Thanks a lot!
I've been reading all I can, I agree with the passive roof vent.
PT, lol, makes sense, thanks!
I'll check if I can see a gasket there.
I don't think there's any moisture barrier behind the panels but read somewhere that it may not need it if the shed is not cooled/heated and if there's good ventilation, so definitely will add the vent.
It has a Z-bar flashing but it looks like they caulked it, not good for what I read. In most areas I'll have to cut about half of the panel, I guess it'll look funny with the Z-bar flashing there.

I read about some Epoxy material that will behave like wood once set. It can take nails, screws, be sanded and painted. Wondering how that will work on the trims after removing the rotted parts. Any experience with that?
Also saw some PVC trim boards I may be able to use if replacing the rotted ones, at least they won't rot but they are costly.

It started raining on Saturday and the forecast for the next 10 days is more rain :vs_rain:so nothing I can do for now but I covered the large hole with plastic to try to keep it dry.
 

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Usually Confused
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Thanks a lot!
I've been reading all I can, I agree with the passive roof vent.
PT, lol, makes sense, thanks!
I'll check if I can see a gasket there.
I don't think there's any moisture barrier behind the panels but read somewhere that it may not need it if the shed is not cooled/heated and if there's good ventilation, so definitely will add the vent.
It has a Z-bar flashing but it looks like they caulked it, not good for what I read. In most areas I'll have to cut about half of the panel, I guess it'll look funny with the Z-bar flashing there.

I read about some Epoxy material that will behave like wood once set. It can take nails, screws, be sanded and painted. Wondering how that will work on the trims after removing the rotted parts. Any experience with that?
Also saw some PVC trim boards I may be able to use if replacing the rotted ones, at least they won't rot but they are costly.

It started raining on Saturday and the forecast for the next 10 days is more rain :vs_rain:so nothing I can do for now but I covered the large hole with plastic to try to keep it dry.

I am aware of epoxy wood repair products but have not used them. Whether it would be suitable for you depends on how much rot there is; at some point it becomes a structural strength issue.
The moisture barrier gasket I was referring to is for between the concrete and framing sill (bottom) plate, not for behind any siding. Moisture barrier behind siding in an uninsulated, unheated shed is pointless and would actually be worse since it would tend to trap moisture. PVC trim boards are good option, as mentioned by another poster, just more expensive than PT lumber.
 

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retired framer
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Do not do anything before you have pushed it back to straight and braced it there.
 

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Property Mgt/Maint
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+1 on cutting down the tree. Or at least prune it back away from the building. When the building gets wet, the tree being so close, hinders the drying. Mat'ls that stay wet mold and rot.
 
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