DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,082 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
i have my floor torn up, down to the planks that are on the floor joists.
the plants are sqeeky. i have been using screws to fasten them down = kind of a pita. i was thinking that i could use my framing nailer to fasten the planks down. i would only do it around the parameter where furniture would be = not a walked on area. walking areas would still be screwed.

would this be a lasting fix ? it sure would make things go faster/easier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,082 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
oh. i am putting 1/2 sheathing over the planks. then whatever laminate i decide, down the road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37,264 Posts
What are you using to fasten the screws? An impact drill would be the tool of choice.
If your going to nail it make sure to use 2-1/2" ring shank nails.
Sure hope you not trying to use sheetrock screws.
Really need to be adding screws to every single plank not just the outside.
What happens when you install the underlayment and it still squecks?
Sure hope your using underlament rated 1/2" and not something like CDX.
Anything less will have voids in the plys.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
17,158 Posts
I used deck screws that have te sqaure head, when I did our bath floor, before putting down the underlay and tile.

No squeeks. Just place the screws next to where the nails are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37,264 Posts
That's what I use to, mainly because I own a stand up screw gun that uses them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,082 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
What are you using to fasten the screws? An impact drill would be the tool of choice.

If your going to nail it make sure to use 2-1/2" ring shank nails.

Sure hope you not trying to use sheetrock screws.

Really need to be adding screws to every single plank not just the outside.

What happens when you install the underlayment and it still squecks?

Sure hope your using underlament rated 1/2" and not something like CDX.
Anything less will have voids in the plys.
well, you not going to like this. but, it is working just fine.

a regular drill = i don't have to worry about the batteries in my impact drill.

i gave up on the nailing = i don't have any long enough ring shank nails.

cough, umm, cough. uh yeah. i have a bunch of 2" drywall screws. and they work just fine. except for the occasional HARD board, the heads break off. otherwise they working just fine.

yeah, i am using 2 screws per plank. funny (not) thing i am finding, is that a lot of the original nails were put in so close to the edge of the joist, idk how they even stayed in.

i have the sheathing just laying in place (no screws yet). and this floor is pretty darned quiet and solid.

i am using 1/2 sheathing rated osb, 1/8" gap that i will caulk. . i have 2 bedrooms done this way. and the results are good.


now, if you want to tell me what is going to happen because i did it this way, thats fine. but, it is what it is, and i ain't changin it. and i am very happy with the results.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
25,769 Posts
You will be fine---the drywall screws were a poor choice because they can snap---the gold one would have been a better fastener---however--it's done and I doubt if you will ever head from the squeaky nails again---
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,082 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
You will be fine---the drywall screws were a poor choice because they can snap---the gold one would have been a better fastener---however--it's done and I doubt if you will ever head from the squeaky nails again---
:thumbup:. i was thinking that them breaking was the issue, or perhaps rusting.
otherwise i couldn't think of a reason to not use them. like i said, there are a few planks that are very hard and the screws snapped. otherwise the screws set just as they should.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
25,769 Posts
In the future use the gold ones---drywall screws are hardened and ,under stress like shifting wood--the heads can pop off or the shafts snap---

When buying supplies to keep on hand----get the gold ones---they are a few cents higher than the black---but are more versatile---

Just a note---square drive are great for floors and decks---the heads don't strip out like Phillips do---
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,082 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
You would still need the felt, regardless. In the long run you will thank us for the suggestion.
ok. can you be a bit more specific on what the felt does ?
i have a cheap moisture meter in the basement. it says about 15% right now.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
17,158 Posts
15% relative humidity, that is too low. The felt quiets the floor, helps to keep the rooms warmer, and also stops any moisture that may transfer between main living and crawl or basements.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,082 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
15% relative humidity, that is too low.

The felt quiets the floor, helps to keep the rooms warmer, and also stops any moisture that may transfer between main living and crawl or basements.

perhaps, but we are comfortable. sides, idk how accurate the gauge is.
i want to get a good one. but idk what a good one is.

thanx
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
17,158 Posts
Get something like this http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=11361230 I have a older version with one sensor in our attic, one in our garage, that I used to have that one down in our basement. Our house stays around 55% to 62% Rh in the main floor and basement. I have seen it get as low as 39% for a day, but next day would go back to 55%.

You really do not want the Rh too low, due to it will cause more problems than good. Especially with flooring.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top