DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm buying a new house (or an old one but it's new to me) and the texture disgusts me. It looks like the previous owner tried a splatter knockdown texture but it looks just wrong. It's very thick probably 3/16" and the actual texture pattern is spread out. What I mean is that the texture has space between other texture-like not enough material was used per sq ft.

I don't have the patience or the practice to do a flat skim coat and being that the problem is the entire lower level I think that's my last option. I don't want to drywall over the old drywall either.

I was thinking of using my hopper gun and just doing an orange peel over the old texture and call it a day. Will I have a problem with doing the orange peel too thick if I try and cover the old texture in one pass? In that case should I do two passes? OR is there a much better option to cover this atrocity? I don't plan on staying in this new home for more than a year so I am not picky with texture patterns. In fact, if someone out there has an idea that will both fix the eyesore and increase value would be appreciated. I have no idea which texture is considered high end or desirable.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37,178 Posts
Might want to be asking your realtor this question.
Around here you'd have trouble even selling a house with texture on the ceiling or walls.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lendosky

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I'm moving to Minnesota from Arizona so you're probably right about asking my realtor. If it turns out that doing a skim coat is the best solution, how many coats would it take to 'fill' almost 1/4"?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,811 Posts
DO NOT try to texture over top of what's there. Believe it or not, the original texture will telegraph through the new texture you put on and you will have an even bigger mess. To skim something like that, two coats of mud should do it. It's also a helluva lot a work.

Woa, woa, woa, 1/4 inch of texture? Wow, that's some deep sh**. It may take more than 2 coats to fix those kind of craters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I've scraped off popcorn before.... is it possible to scrape this crap off being as it is so thick? Then just either skim it out or texture according to regional demand?

The surface is painted, of course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,606 Posts
Pole sander with 80 grit, a lot of dirty work. Good news you don't have to sand it all off. Just sand until there is only a little left then skim.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
hey hey hey everyone! I got possession of the home last Thursday the 12th, have been sick and got kidney stones so I was laid up for a day and a half. Oh the joys of moving halfway across the country in the winter....anyways I bought a couple of scrapers and holy crap did they work! sort of. I would scrape off the texture but occasionally gouge the drywall so that's an additional headache. I did, however, get smarter. I called a rental place after reading some of the other threads on this site and found a drywall sander with vacuum. It's a pole sander with a round head and a heap vacuum attached to it. It's loud and a little cumbersome but my shoulders are thanking me for it. I was in real pain beating myself up after scraping one room for three hours before it was completed. I picked up the sander/vac combo, plugged it in and went to town. In one hour since picking up the sander I completed the adjacent bedroom, went over the original bedroom to smooth things out a little better, did a hallway and was going to continue on until my wife started yelling at me about the noise. She's telecommuting today and I guess when I was in the hall the noise just went crazy. I don't think I will have the sander back in under the 4 hour deadline but I am so happy that only my back is sore and not my back, my arms and shoulders from the scrapers and a pole sander.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
here's some before and after pics. The walls were green or purple and I scraped all the texture off leaving white where the texture was previously. I finally finished running all of my electrical and have to patch holes today and tomorrow hopefully sand. My next question is this-I'm going to do a knockdown texture over this existing monstrosity. What step should I take prior to shooting that texture? I know after I texture I should prime before I paint because the mud will 'suck' all the paint in but what about before the texture on an existing painted surface?

Thanks
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Yeah, so can I texture over this now? Of course I'm fixing all the gouges right now and doing other repairs first. Or must I skim first? And do I prime after the texture? I just need some help with the order of operations. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,606 Posts
In Fla that's called a knockdown and from the looks of the pics it needs more sanding or a skim coat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Toolseeker: I think its a heavy heavy orange peel because it wasn't knocked down. I could be wrong since drywall certainly is not my forte. Anywho, I must sand more? When I rub my hand across the surface, the wall feels very smooth. I would rather not skim it because it's so time consuming and again I'm not what you would call a pro or even an amateur. Therefore if it is smooth, will the new texture stick to the wall?

I do realize that in the gouges I will have to skim in order to flatten it out. I'm talking about the general surface of the entire wall.

Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,606 Posts
Toolseeker: I think its a heavy heavy orange peel because it wasn't knocked down. I could be wrong since drywall certainly is not my forte. Anywho, I must sand more? When I rub my hand across the surface, the wall feels very smooth. I would rather not skim it because it's so time consuming and again I'm not what you would call a pro or even an amateur. Therefore if it is smooth, will the new texture stick to the wall?

I do realize that in the gouges I will have to skim in order to flatten it out. I'm talking about the general surface of the entire wall.

Thank you.
From the pics it looked like it was still proud but you are there if it feels smooth then you should be good to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Toolseeker: you are boss. If you are ever in Minneapolis, let me know. I'd like to buy you a drink... or seven. The pictures were poor quality I know but I assure you it is smooth. Sweet! I'll finish my sanding today and tomorrow on my repairs and then come Sunday I'll start the texture. I'm so excited I could scream.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top