DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just fumbled my way through connecting 10 ga. wires for my table saw power connection. I bent the wire into a hook shape, but when I tried to get it under the screws of the outlet it was so thick that it slipped when I tightened the screw.

I eventually got it to work by pinching the wire together under the screw. I would appreciate any tricks and tips you all could offer. It seems to me that by now someone somewhere would have invented a better way to connect wire. The plumbing world has the Shark Bite connectors that make soldering obsolete. Is there anything new in electrical?

I just do not so this stuff frequently enough to get the hang of it. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
The table saw is wired for 220V. I can not remember the actual number of the outlet, but it is for the plug from my saw. I used a double pole 15 amp switch at the circuit breaker.

The 10 ga. wire has been there a while so I assumed it had to be used. I guess I could have gotten way with 12 ga. However, 12 ga. is no picnic to work with compared to 14 ga.

My overall point is that I am not an electrician, but a landlord who does most oh his own work. Time is money for me, and I am just wondering if there is some fast but safe new way to connect up wires to outlets and switches.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,487 Posts
What do you mean it slipped when you tightened it? If the wire is looped clockwise, that is, the direction the screw turns, the loop will close itself as the screw is tightened.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I did wind the wire clockwise, but as I tightened the screw the wire is so big that it was pushed up and away from the advancing screw.

My overall point is to find if there is anything I can order or look for in stores that make working with connections and jamming my hands in small tight boxes a little easier. If you do this stuff every day you probably know some tricks and can make several connections to my one. I just want to save time.
 

·
Electrical Contractor
Joined
·
3,368 Posts
If you are really bent on using such a large conductor for a smaller outlet, then the best way to terminate it is to pigtail a short piece of #12 to it, and connect that to the outlet. :huh:

30 Amp receptacles for 30 Amp loads would have lugs suitable for #10, and not present a problem for proper terminations. :whistling2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,758 Posts
Sockets/connections meant for 10 gauge wire (that I have seen, anyway) all had a set screw type arrangement where you screwed down the wire. I would think that for a large diameter wire like that you would use a crimp connector on the wire/socket connection in other applications. 10 gauge is hard to bend around a screw, as you have discovered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Ok Bigplanz you are answering my question. I Googled crimp connectors and saw some pictures. When and how are they used? Thanks.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top