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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Got cable running from the panel. Nothing on circuit presently.

Like to use the circuit to
1. install a light operated by a switch
2. replace the 220 AC receptacle (no longer needed) with 110 receptacle
3. add another receptacle before or after the switch.

I'd like to use the three existing cable runs, which means the power will run from the panel to a junction, then the light / switch / replacement receptacle (see pic).

I'll add the new receptacle near the switch later.

Cable from new ceiling light not shown... Black, White, and Ground.

Question is, does power going into the light first affect the wiring to the switch?
 

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Got cable running from the panel. Nothing on circuit presently.

Like to use the circuit to
1. install a light operated by a switch
2. replace the 220 AC receptacle (no longer needed) with 110 receptacle
3. add another receptacle before or after the switch.

I'd like to use the three existing cable runs, which means the power will run from the panel to a junction, then the light / switch / replacement receptacle (see pic).

I'll add the new receptacle near the switch later.

Cable from new ceiling light not shown... Black, White, and Ground.

Question is, does power going into the light first affect the wiring to the switch?
Yes.

You will need to wirenut the incoming black to the black in the cable going to the switch. At the switch, connect the black to one terminal and the white to the other. Mark the white with a black piece of tape to indicate it is NOT a neutral. The white/black then carries the switched hot line back to the light fixture, where you again mark it with black, and connect it to the black wire from the fixture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Not using the red at either end (xx-3 is existing cable; using it instead of running new cable). So Dave632's first diag should work. But it doesn't. I get light all the time; switch doesn't affect it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
still not working

I've looked at Dave's diag (not using red wire to switch - per Techy's xx-3 comment) and ck'd the connections a few times. New switch, but replaced that anyway. I'm missing something.

The light goes on with the breaker. But it does NOT shut off at the switch. ???
 

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Resi EC
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I've looked at Dave's diag (not using red wire to switch - per Techy's xx-3 comment) and ck'd the connections a few times. New switch, but replaced that anyway. I'm missing something.

The light goes on with the breaker. But it does NOT shut off at the switch. ???
It would be better to use the red conductor.

At the light, black to black ... white to white (tie whites to fixture), red to switch and light, cap the white at switch.
 

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Connect the blk from panel to black "old ac" with white to switch. Connect blk switch wire at jb to fixture,connect white fixture wire to all remaining whites in jb and wire not. Connect blk and white at switch to screws and mark white with black tape.
 

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Is there any other cables at the switch? or just the 3-wire?

It appears you didn't get the correct advice here if you are adding a receptacle coming off the switch.

Connect the all the blacks together
Connect all the whites together
Red and black to the switch, cap the white for a future neutral
Black of the fixture to the red in the ceiling
White of the fixture to the 3 whites in the ceiling
 
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sublime2 said:
Connect the blk from panel to black "old ac" with white to switch. Connect blk switch wire at jb to fixture,connect white fixture wire to all remaining whites in jb and wire not. Connect blk and white at switch to screws and mark white with black tape.
Since you stated your not using the red ( only there because that's the wire you have available)
If there was no red wire the above would also work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Still not right...

Is there any other cables at the switch? or just the 3-wire?

It appears you didn't get the correct advice here if you are adding a receptacle coming off the switch.

Connect the all the blacks together
Connect all the whites together
Red and black to the switch, cap the white for a future neutral
Black of the fixture to the red in the ceiling
White of the fixture to the 3 whites in the ceiling
Just finished trying the above...still not right. Light's on with the breaker; off with the breaker.

Switch doesn't turn the light off.

Replaced the switch again (3rd one).

I'm doing something wrong, but damned if I can see what it is. Maybe it'll look different in the morning.
 

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"So I Re-Wired It"
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2. replace the 220 AC receptacle (no longer needed) with 110 receptacle
just wanted to point out, in the photo it doesnt look as tho there were a 220 line for any appliance.
if there were, obviously the breaker would need to be swapped out from a double pole to single.....
unless you already did this;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Sooo, did you get it working??
yes... learned a lot while going through the process. "starting over" with the wiring a number of times caused me to eventually considering changing the switch a second time. original switch must have been bad. second switch (1st replacement switch) came from a box of left-over new parts (a few switches, receptacles, outlet boxes, etc.) from a basement remodel. didn't consider a "new" switch could be bad; at least not right away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
just wanted to point out, in the photo it doesnt look as tho there were a 220 line for any appliance.
if there were, obviously the breaker would need to be swapped out from a double pole to single.....
unless you already did this;)
good observation. yes, it had been swapped out when the old wall unit ac was pulled. and, during the process of trying to get this working, i traced it back to the panel, just to be certain.

something i read at another site a couple of days before stumbling on the switch solution talked about certain overhead florescent light fixtures that included a plug for installation, were NOT meant to be connected directly to a switch. this was the case here; working with an old shop light, but still in the box that included a short wire/3 prong plug. so I rewired the light to include the plug and installed a receptacle next to the junction. not sure if this would have been necessary, 'cause i did it before changing the switch. any thoughts about that?
 

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"So I Re-Wired It"
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The 3 prong cords that come on a shop light are typically stranded wire.
Some may say it would be fine to leave it hard wired, but my view is that
Its best to be used as intended by the manufacturer.

You probably wouldnt have problems if left hard wired.
IMO, it was not a waste to repair the plug end.

Just for an added note, NEC does mention that UL listed appliances and devices are to be used
In accordance with manufacture design/specs.
 
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