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Discussion Starter #1
Hey, folks. I just want to verify something.

I just ordered a new Ingersoll Rand 2340L5 compressor for my shop, and it will be here on Saturday. I want to get a jump on the wiring, but details on wiring requirements from the manufacturer are sketchy at best, and they want a serial number in order to grant me access to the online version of the owner's manual. I do know that the motor is 5 HP, 230 VAC. It should pull about 28 amps running.

My shop has its own 200 Amp service, but I'm going to need to add a circuit for this thing. What I don't know is how big it needs to be. Rumour has it the manufacturer suggests a 60 Amp circuit. Does that sound right? I've never installed a compressor before, but I bet some of you have.
 

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Something is very fishy here for starters. You order a high priced air compressor and the manufacturer will not allow you (the owner) to view a PDF user manual. I think I would call my credit card company and put a dispute on the purchase today. The means Ingersoll Rand gets no money. And of course you are just using this method as a way to get them to fax you a copy if necessary.
Theres got to be more to this story as you cannot possibly have the serial number unless you have the compressor.. But here goes.

1) 70 Amp 2 pole breaker.
2) 10/2 wire
 

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Something is very fishy here for starters. You order a high priced air compressor and the manufacturer will not allow you (the owner) to view a PDF user manual. I think I would call my credit card company and put a dispute on the purchase today. The means Ingersoll Rand gets no money. And of course you are just using this method as a way to get them to fax you a copy if necessary.
Theres got to be more to this story as you cannot possibly have the serial number unless you have the compressor.. But here goes.

1) 70 Amp 2 pole breaker.
2) 10/2 wire
I put in bold that only if the motor do have interal protection or overload relay on the contractor if do not have either one then you have to use smaller breaker to protect the motor.

Myself I rather have contractor to protect the motor from abuse and what more the pressure switch are not really designed to handle large blast of current during startup.

Merci,Marc
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm guessing it has something to do with running changes. They've been making the same model compressor for years, and surely individual parts have changed a few times here and there, so the serial number may only be a means of ensuring you end up with the proper version of the manual. Some folks selling them, like Grainger, for example, seem to have them built with a different brand motor, as well.

On top of that, they seem to offer two levels of each model, i.e., a high-end version with all the bells and whistles, and a value-series, which comes pretty much bare, and may also make some difference in which manual is needed. I do believe I ordered the value line, which comes without an automatic tank drain, etc. (I already own some goodies that I can use with it, so I didn't figure I needed them.)

To be honest, I'm not really sure what I ordered. I know that sounds strange, but I really needed a compressor, as my old one locked up, and my business depends on having functional equipment. I ordered something that met my current air needs, plus a little extra for cushion.

So, 70 amp? Why 70 instead of 60? The math involved in sizing a motor circuit is beyond me still, but I'm trying to wrap my brain around it.
 

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Hi

Unfortunately as you pointed out the online info for your compressor is not available. If the motor has internal overload protection and the motor nameplate states that it is 5 hp 230 volts then 28 amps is a good bet and you could start running some wiring. Many compressors in the general specs. show peak horsepower and we cannot use this to size your conductors for the branch circuit. We need motor nameplate data.

I would just wait for the compressor to arrive and then post the information from the manufacturer or the motor nameplate for us. It is possible that this motor may require a starter with overload but I think in the end it will be a simple branch circuit sized by the motor rules of the nec unless it comes with a cord and plug.

For your information if both horsepower and running amps are listed on the motor nameplate and the unit carries a lab listing like underwriters limited (UL). Then the nameplate amps can be used for sizing the branch circuit conductors. This is because the testing laboratory has verified that the motor does indeed operate at those running amps under load. Otherwise we have to use the table FLC amps from article 430... table 430.248 which happen to be 28 amps for a 5 hp 230 volt motor.

Rregardless we take the applicable amps and increase them by a factor of 1.25. If 28 amps then the branch circuit conductors would be required to carry 1.25 x 28 = 35 amps. The circuit breaker can be as much as 2.5 times the running amps in order to be sure that the compressor will start due to the surge of amps when starting before dropping off to its running amps. That would mean the circuit brekaer could be a maximum of 70 amps. These are special rules for motors that have internal overload protection.

In this case if you need 35 amp conductors you could serve the compressor with 10 awg copper thhn conductors in conduit. If you use a cable like nm-b (romex) then you will need #8 copper nm-b.

I don't consider this compressor to be industrial but more like light commercial so I doubt your going to need more than 10 awg and a I would probably see if it would start on a 40 amp breaker.

Really can't say without more information from the manufacturer.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Hi

Unfortunately as you pointed out the online info for your compressor is not available. If the motor has internal overload protection and the motor nameplate states that it is 5 hp 230 volts then 28 amps is a good bet and you could start running some wiring. Many compressors in the general specs. show peak horsepower and we cannot use this to size your conductors for the branch circuit. We need motor nameplate data.

I would just wait for the compressor to arrive and then post the information from the manufacturer or the motor nameplate for us. It is possible that this motor may require a starter with overload but I think in the end it will be a simple branch circuit sized by the motor rules of the nec unless it comes with a cord and plug.

For your information if both horsepower and running amps are listed on the motor nameplate and the unit carries a lab listing like underwriters limited (UL). Then the nameplate amps can be used for sizing the branch circuit conductors. This is because the testing laboratory has verified that the motor does indeed operate at those running amps under load. Otherwise we have to use the table FLC amps from article 430... table 430.248 which happen to be 28 amps for a 5 hp 230 volt motor.

Rregardless we take the applicable amps and increase them by a factor of 1.25. If 28 amps then the branch circuit conductors would be required to carry 1.25 x 28 = 35 amps. The circuit breaker can be as much as 2.5 times the running amps in order to be sure that the compressor will start due to the surge of amps when starting before dropping off to its running amps. That would mean the circuit brekaer could be a maximum of 70 amps. These are special rules for motors that have internal overload protection.

In this case if you need 35 amp conductors you could serve the compressor with 10 awg copper thhn conductors in conduit. If you use a cable like nm-b (romex) then you will need #8 copper nm-b.

I don't consider this compressor to be industrial but more like light commercial so I doubt your going to need more than 10 awg and a I would probably see if it would start on a 40 amp breaker.

Really can't say without more information from the manufacturer.

Hope this helps.
Good stuff. Now I get it. Thank you!

Yeah, you're right. It's more of a light commercial than an industrial unit, but at least it is rated for continuous duty. (Guess how I killed my oil-free Devilbiss compressor!)

I hate to do this, as it means more down time, but I will just wait until the compressor is delivered. It is apparent that there is not much else I can do before then without potentially shooting myself in the foot.

Oddly enough, I found that I already have an unused dedicated circuit run in my shop with 10 thhn wire and a 30 amp two pole breaker. I might get lucky enough to only need to swap in a breaker.
 

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Oddly enough, I found that I already have an unused dedicated circuit run in my shop with 10 thhn wire and a 30 amp two pole breaker. I might get lucky enough to only need to swap in a breaker
.

If the unit only needs 10 awg you might get lucky enough to not have to do anything.....:)
 

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I put in bold that only if the motor do have interal protection or overload relay on the contractor if do not have either one then you have to use smaller breaker to protect the motor.

Myself I rather have contractor to protect the motor from abuse and what more the pressure switch are not really designed to handle large blast of current during startup.

Merci,Marc
Marc. All I had to work with was 28 amps, 240 volts and a single phase motor. We may get more info as he is waiting for the compressor to show up.

I still do not understand how Ingersoll Rand could not get him the specs BEFORE it's delivered. They would not get away with that if I had ordered it. I would not have given them the order without the specs first. Is that not how we do business in this trade? Buy something without knowing the specs first? Naw, not me. :no:
 

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I think the OP tried to get the specs online after ordering the compressor based on its scfm and tank size. Generally speaking the electrical requirements would be the last thing you would worry about as long as it was single phase motor operated. It is much more important to know if the compressor will supply the necessary scfm at the necessary psi for your needs. Wiring the thing is generally an after thought.

I'm sure if he contacted them e-mail or phone they would get the motor specs to him for the branch circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I think the OP tried to get the specs online after ordering the compressor based on its scfm and tank size. Generally speaking the electrical requirements would be the last thing you would worry about as long as it was single phase motor operated. It is much more important to know if the compressor will supply the necessary scfm at the necessary psi for your needs. Wiring the thing is generally an after thought.

I'm sure if he contacted them e-mail or phone they would get the motor specs to him for the branch circuit.

You got it. Having a shop with its own 200 Amp service, I paid no attention to electrical requirements beyond it being single phase. What mattered to me the most were my air demands. Everything beyond that was just details.

Now, as far as getting specs from IR goes... I did write to them, and received a response today. The email I received asked me to please supply the serial number of my unit. I would not have been at all shocked by their response if I had not already specifically expressed in my initial email to them that I had not yet taken delivery of the compressor, and so I could not supply a serial number. Someone clearly has poor reading comprehension.

To be clear, I didn't order this thing from IR, or any other company experienced with compressors by any means. Once I tell you who I ordered it from, you're going to die, but you're also going to understand the lack of sales support. Just let it be known that it was the best price that I could find, even with tax and delivery charges. That said... I admit that I purchased it from Sears. :eek:

I know. I know. Not the best place to buy anything, period. I did get an acceptable deal on it, though. No one local could touch their price, and the online stores all would have cost me a $50 residential delivery fee, plus a $75 liftgate fee, and they would have only dropped the compressor off in the front of the house, leaving me to move it to 250 feet down a sloping gravel driveway by myself.

Anyway, back to the compressor itself. I did get some good info. It doesn't include a magnetic starter, but the motor is thermally protected. I'm not sure how I feel about that. Every 5 HP+ model that IR makes includes a magnetic starter except for the model I bought. I thought it would include one, but the small print excludes my model, and my model alone. Should I start cursing?

slogarage, it starts on a 30? That strikes me as odd. (Of course, maybe it's one of those evil FPE breakers that never trips. Ha!)

I'm curious if you would mind sharing the data from your motor tag. I'm not going to count on it being identical to the motor on mine, but still, I am curious.
 

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Marc. All I had to work with was 28 amps, 240 volts and a single phase motor. We may get more info as he is waiting for the compressor to show up.

I still do not understand how Ingersoll Rand could not get him the specs BEFORE it's delivered. They would not get away with that if I had ordered it. I would not have given them the order without the specs first. Is that not how we do business in this trade? Buy something without knowing the specs first? Naw, not me. :no:
I know what you mean I do the same thing Always get the specs before I get something or order a item for customer that way it will CYA on that matter.

Now to the OP.,

Speaking of magatic starter the cheaper models under 5 HP useally don't have it but a very good compressor will have magatinc starter on it due some cheap compressor motor have " special " rating if that unit stated 5 HP or 6.5 HP that really more like 2 or 3 HP motor size if you see the motor frame look small then it not really the best for hevey duty useage but for average homeowner use it can go either way.

The cost of magatic starter will varies a bit depending on model and phase and type of overloads.

My shop have 15 hp [ set up for 480 v 3Ø ] yeah big one of course with GE contractor the only reason why I get GE due easy to get into contract buttons real quick if I have issue with it { the compressor is set up for on/off or contouinis running by changeing the slection switch.

However I do get alot of customer asked me to add a magentic switch due their pressure switch got overheated so that something you may want to watchout for it.

Merci,Marc
 

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want of (online) help fr. Mfr.?

Hey, folks. I just want to verify something.

I just ordered a new Ingersoll Rand 2340L5 compressor for my shop, and it will be here on Saturday. I want to get a jump on the wiring, but details on wiring requirements from the manufacturer are sketchy at best, and they want a serial number in order to grant me access to the online version of the owner's manual. I do know that the motor is 5 HP, 230 VAC. It should pull about 28 amps running.

My shop has its own 200 Amp service, but I'm going to need to add a circuit for this thing. What I don't know is how big it needs to be. Rumour has it the manufacturer suggests a 60 Amp circuit. Does that sound right? I've never installed a compressor before, but I bet some of you have.
I'm surprised to hear that the Mfr./Distributor is slow in forthcoming with the relevant technical information. Especially if you're a customer. Your best bet in this case is to await the NEW arrival. Because you'll have to look at the FLA and LRA (Full load amperage & Locked rotor Amperage) in order to calculate the proper, adequate and Code-compliant power supply and protection. (Now more than ever) :yes::no::drink:Don't Drink and Drive!!!
 

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The compressor is an IR 2340L5 I ordered from Ohio Power Tool. I took some pics of the motor label but they were not too clear. I've attached one here.

The FLA stated on the motor label is 21.5 amps. The motor does have a reset button. And I have not hooked it up yet. I just finished mounting the tank. I will have it wired this weekend.

I too was concerned about the magnetic starter, but it appears that the mag starters are installed on the 3 phase models not the single phase which is what I have.

I also looked at the sears price, but went with OPT because it was free shipping, included the stater kit (extends the warranty 12 months) and I got an IR 1/2" impact wrench.

Let me know if you want anymore info.
 

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I did get charged for the lift gate delivery, but it was worth it, the guy brought it up my driveway into the garage, very painless!! :)
 

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PDF] Choosing a Compressor

File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - View as HTML
nailer requires a compressor with at least a. 6-hp pump and a 60-gal. or 80-gal. tank. If ... ton before going into the storage tank. Two-stage pump Air is compressed ... For four times the money, an industrial-quality, 80-gal. machine .... at 15 amps, while the 5-hp Ingersoll-Rand's motor is rated at 28 amps. ...
www.finewoodworking.com/FWNPDF/011164050.pdf - Similar

Sounds like it....
Be safe, G
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The compressor is an IR 2340L5 I ordered from Ohio Power Tool. I took some pics of the motor label but they were not too clear. I've attached one here.

The FLA stated on the motor label is 21.5 amps. The motor does have a reset button. And I have not hooked it up yet. I just finished mounting the tank. I will have it wired this weekend.

I too was concerned about the magnetic starter, but it appears that the mag starters are installed on the 3 phase models not the single phase which is what I have.

I also looked at the sears price, but went with OPT because it was free shipping, included the stater kit (extends the warranty 12 months) and I got an IR 1/2" impact wrench.

Let me know if you want anymore info.
If I squint hard enough, I'm sure I can read that.

This is unrelated to the topic at hand, but Sears automatically extends the warranty from one year to two years without the starter kit. (They don't even offer the starter kit for sale.) Of course, it remains to be seen whether Sears will even exist a year from now.

Post back up after you get it wired. You'll probably beat me by at least a full day, and I'm curious to see how your wiring works out.

Oh, and I'm still a little bummed by the lack of a starter. I can't help but think it would be good to have.
 

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The compressor is an IR 2340L5 I ordered from Ohio Power Tool. I took some pics of the motor label but they were not too clear. I've attached one here.

The FLA stated on the motor label is 21.5 amps. The motor does have a reset button. And I have not hooked it up yet. I just finished mounting the tank. I will have it wired this weekend.

I too was concerned about the magnetic starter, but it appears that the mag starters are installed on the 3 phase models not the single phase which is what I have.

I also looked at the sears price, but went with OPT because it was free shipping, included the stater kit (extends the warranty 12 months) and I got an IR 1/2" impact wrench.

Let me know if you want anymore info.
Do you need help sizing the breaker or the wires? You did not say.
It's common not to have a motor starter on a single phase compressor of this size. But it's not a bad idea either. As Marc stated, the pressure switch is what starts and stops the motor. If the pressure switch contacts are not over sized and of very good quality, you will be replacing the pressure switch before you should have too. So, if you are relying on this compressor for income, you may want to consider installing a starter and external overload yourself. We can help you if you like. Good luck and GET BACK TO WORK!:laughing:

OP. Whats wrong with Sears? You got a good deal. Thats what counts. You got a very good name in that compressor too.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Do you need help sizing the breaker or the wires? You did not say.
It's common not to have a motor starter on a single phase compressor of this size. But it's not a bad idea either. As Marc stated, the pressure switch is what starts and stops the motor. If the pressure switch contacts are not over sized and of very good quality, you will be replacing the pressure switch before you should have too. So, if you are relying on this compressor for income, you may want to consider installing a starter and external overload yourself. We can help you if you like. Good luck and GET BACK TO WORK!:laughing:

OP. Whats wrong with Sears? You got a good deal. Thats what counts. You got a very good name in that compressor too.
I think slogarage has a handle on his wiring at this point, or at least seems to. For the record, we both have two-stage compressors. That's why I am disappointed in the lack of a starter. Everything I know about compressors says that any 5 HP two-stage compressor should have one. (Not that I know too much about compressors.)

Off topic again for a moment: Sears is okay, I suppose. They just always seem to have about the worst possible customer service. I know that it boils down to the individuals at a particular store, but holy cow, do they ever excel at hiring folks who know nothing about what they are trying to sell. Adding insult to injury, guess who you have to call to schedule an appointment when something needs service? India. :censored: Of course, they want you to describe the problem in detail, and somehow we never seem to speak the same version of English as "Bob" or "Pat" when we call. On the other hand, it is funny when they begin and end each sentence with "sir" while they are talking to my wife. :laughing:

I do, however, like one particular sales person that works in the appliance department at our local store. She's our go-to for dryers, refrigerators, etc. She knows her stuff, and when we can call her and tell her what we're looking for, she can quickly make appropriate suggestions, and even discuss technical details! To top it off, she will actually tell us when the next sale is that we can take advantage of, and gives us a courtesy call the day before the sale goes in to effect. When we come in, she already has the paperwork done, too. She's awesome. I just wish they'd go back to hiring people like her to run the rest of the store.

Back on topic: I will be relying on my compressor for income. The death of my last compressor has delayed several projects that are meant to be examples of my work. Making the compressor reliable is a top priority for me, because once business is rolling, I do not want this kind of downtime.
I would like very much to add a starter and external protection to it. Also, I'd like to add an hour meter.

I do have one concern with hour meters, specifically. There are many 230VAC choices, but I'm worried about vibration damaging them. Also, I have found no surface mount options, and will apparently need an enclosure for a flange mounted meter. Suggestions?
 

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The hour meter use on air compressor it should be not too bad but you can have it mounted remote if you want to if you are condering about vibrations and many hourmeter are tested with vibrations with gas/diesel powered unit they do shake a bit more than straght electric units otherwise get a digtail hourmeter they can really take a abuse with it.

Merci,Marc
 
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