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Hey guys just trying to get an understanding before I dig too deep or get an Electrican out. ( would like to avoid as I’m on a budget, as long as I can get comfortable with what must/can be done) I bought a heater which shows it’s a 240 v heater but only shows instructions for a 3 wire’s in the manual..

I only have 1 220/240 volt plug in my house and it’s a 14-30r for my dryer .. I bought a splitter and had some 40’ 10 awg gauge 4 strand wiring left over from a project and was going to plug both the dryer and heater into the same plug via a $50 Amazon splitter being sure to only use one at a time.. it’s on a 30 amp double pole breaker with the heater drawing a 21 amp load. My understanding is a 4 wire has 2 hot’s, neutral and ground where as the 3 wire is 2 hots and a ground.

I’m causally familiar with electrical and using a multimeter. If I can see a YouTube I can do it however having a hard time finding anything on this specific topic. A lot on wiring 4 wires appliance to 3 prong plug but not the other way around.

so I could skip the neutral at the appliance, but how is that gonna affect plugging into an outlet that has an active neutral? Non factor ? As the neutral has no current ?
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Cut one of the 4 wire plugs off. Relpace with three wire female plug. Eliminate the neutral wire at this point with a good electrical tape.


so I could skip the neutral at the appliance, but how is that gonna affect plugging into an outlet that has an active neutral? Non factor ? As the neutral has no current ?
If you get inbetween the neutal whilst it has a load on it. It will light yo ass up. The equipment ground will ussually not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Is that device UL listed?
No it’s ETL

Cut one of the 4 wire plugs off. Relpace with three wire female plug. Eliminate the neutral wire at this point with a good electrical tape.


so I could skip the neutral at the appliance, but how is that gonna affect plugging into an outlet that has an active neutral? Non factor ? As the neutral has no current ?
If you get inbetween the neutal whilst it has a load on it. It will light yo ass up. The equipment ground will ussually not.
so your saying just cap and don’t use the neutral wire and I can still plug it into the receptacle and it will pull the 2 hot’s and ground and since the neutral isn’t there on the plug it won’t pull or affect anything even though it’s there on the receptacle?
 

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Cut one of the 4 wire plugs off. Relpace with three wire female plug. Eliminate the neutral wire at this point with a good electrical tape.
NO, NO, NO, NO!

I'm no expert, but I know that's a bad idea.

Real electricians will be along shortly to correct me if I'm wrong, and probably advise you that, per the code, cords are for temporary, not permanent use. However, if you're going to do it I strongly recommend you don't cut and mangle your splitter! You could wire the cord with a 4 prong plug that fits the splitter, and wire it into the heater with 2 hots and ground, and cap (wire nut) the neutral.

What I would do, for more versatility later, is wire 35' of the cord with 4 prong plugs on both ends, with all 4 wires connected, and wire a 5' cord on the heater, as I outlined above. That way, you have a neutral available on the 35' extension cord for later upgrades.

And yes, having a neutral capped and unused at an appliance that doesn't require one, is a non-factor.
 

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Maybe I am the only one that read the notes on the electrical diagram. The directions say to use a 50 amp breaker. Yes I read the part in the box where it says 30.

I see no advantage in the adapter you bought. NONE. There are 4 prongs on every plug or receptacle. I thought you issue was 4 wire to 3 wire. So how does this green thing help. Or am I missing something?

As stated before cords are not for permanent installations.

I looked at the web page and this heater did not show the UL safety logo on the documentation.
I have worked with electrical products for over 50 years, I do not have nor will I install a not tested and approved electrical product.
 

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NO, NO, NO, NO!

I'm no expert, but I know that's a bad idea.

Real electricians will be along shortly to correct me if I'm wrong, and probably advise you that, per the code, cords are for temporary, not permanent use. However, if you're going to do it I strongly recommend you don't cut and mangle your splitter! You could wire the cord with a 4 prong plug that fits the splitter, and wire it into the heater with 2 hots and ground, and cap (wire nut) the neutral.

What I would do, for more versatility later, is wire 35' of the cord with 4 prong plugs on both ends, with all 4 wires connected, and wire a 5' cord on the heater, as I outlined above. That way, you have a neutral available on the 35' extension cord for later upgrades.

And yes, having a neutral capped and unused at an appliance that doesn't require one, is a non-factor.
Dude the OPs question of using that stupid ass cord was so stupid. I thought I gave an acceptably stupid resolve to fix the OPs endeavour.. Come on man...
Sometimes you have to get in the ditch to talk with the diggers. BTW I did say to check your smoke detectors. (y)
That cord is so rediculessness, It truly seemed like a joke.
 

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Dude the OPs question of using that stupid ass cord was so stupid. I thought I gave an acceptably stupid resolve to fix the OPs endeavour.. Come on man...
Sometimes you have to get in the ditch to talk with the diggers. BTW I did say to check your smoke detectors. (y)
That cord is so rediculessness, It truly seemed like a joke.
Well, just in case the OP didn't recognize your response as sarcasm (I didn't), I decided I should try to make sure the OP (or anyone else) didn't put themselves in danger. Snark and sarcasm don't always come through in written responses. Perhaps in the future you could more clearly indicate when you write something that is not to be taken as a serious recommendation.

Btw, I see nothing "stupid" or ridiculous about using a 10 gauge cord, with the proper plugs, on a 30 amp circuit. I'd be curious as to why you think is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Maybe I am the only one that read the notes on the electrical diagram. The directions say to use a 50 amp breaker. Yes I read the part in the box where it says 30.

I see no advantage in the adapter you bought. NONE. There are 4 prongs on every plug or receptacle. I thought you issue was 4 wire to 3 wire. So how does this green thing help. Or am I missing something?

As stated before cords are not for permanent installations.

I looked at the web page and this heater did not show the UL safety logo on the documentation.
I have worked with electrical products for over 50 years, I do not have nor will I install a not tested and approved electrical product.
so the splitter is so I don’t have to pull my dryer out everytime I want to run the heater and switch from the dryer to heater plug … as stated it is the only 220 v in the house and is a 14-30r and the splitter is so I can leave both plugged in …

the 10 awg 4 wire would go from the heater to the 14-30r dryer plug that has been split with the 14-30 splitter. Go in summary I want to be able to leave both plugged in the only 220v I have in the house is a 4 plug 14-30r .. my appliance only shows instructions for a 3 wire hook up.

That’s about as clear as I can be based on what I know. If this is undoable/ bad idea / not feasible I’m all ears
 

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Btw, I see nothing "stupid" or ridiculous about using a 10 gauge cord, with the proper plugs, on a 30 amp circuit. I'd be curious as to why you think is.
Cord is not a chapter 3 wiring method and is only allowed in a limited set of permanent installations (enumerated in NEC). The installation instructions for the heater implicitly presume chapter 3 wiring method by showing a conduit.

Putting two outlets on the same circuit (one receptacle, for the dryer, and one hardwire outlet, for the heater), connected with a chapter 3 wiring method, is closer to code. However it is not code compliant because the loads exceed the capacity of the branch circuit.

All that said, if this is a renter in a rental situation then the cord and adapters are somewhat more justified.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Cord is not a chapter 3 wiring method and is only allowed in a limited set of permanent installations (enumerated in NEC). The installation instructions for the heater implicitly presume chapter 3 wiring method by showing a conduit.

Putting two outlets on the same circuit (one receptacle, for the dryer, and one hardwire outlet, for the heater), connected with a chapter 3 wiring method, is closer to code. However it is not code compliant because the loads exceed the capacity of the branch circuit.

All that said, if this is a renter in a rental situation then the cord and adapters are somewhat more justified.
sure makes sense it is a rental just trying to make it work but also don’t want to put myself or house and a clear and present danger.. of corse not ideal but wondering if it passes the smell test ..
I agree zanydroid; it's not the best solution, but I believe it's a reasonable one, and not deserving of the snarky (and if taken seriously, dangerous) response I was responding to.
 

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You can also make the custom y-cable you want. Start with an spare dryer cord whip. Gang a couple boxes onto it; one with a 14-30R and one 6-30R.

Code does have a lot of safety content, but there's a lot of rules that amount to selective idiot-proofing. I know I can't expect to run two 1500W loads on a 15 or 20A circuit (120v), but there's no code rule to prevent me trying.
 

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Ok for the flex cord approach for a rental, it’s a matter of finding a quality adapter. Buying on Amazon is scary from a bad apples selling garbage angle. Vs going to big box store and buying 10/3 flex, plugs, receptacles and putting it together yourself. You can find instructions to do similar stuff if you look on YouTube for instructions on making a high quality generator cord.

Or instead of amazon, buying from one of the established companies, there’s some RV accessories companies with good reputation.
 

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I bought a heater which shows it’s a 240 v heater but only shows instructions for a 3 wire’s in the manual..
In 240V appliances, use of neutral is optional and is only needed to power 120V sub-loads, such as your oven light... or the motor and controls on a dryer (they want to make that stuff 120V so it's the same as the gas dryers).

A/C, water heaters and space heaters do not need neutral.


via a $50 Amazon splitter
Sure if cost is no object..... but don't make it harder than it is. There is no limit to the number of receptacles on a 15A, 20A or 30A circuit. So you simply run 10/2 Romex to a new junction box where you stick a NEMA 6-30 socket. (or 10/3 Romex to a 14-30 socket but then you'd have to bring neutral in the cable).

The new junction box/socket can be right next to your dryer's socket, or wherever else you find convenient and are willing to buy the wires to reach. They can also be inside the walls for good aesthetics.

Then you plug in your heater. However heaters must be hard-wired unless unless the heater is frequently moved around, so come up with some sort of rig to let you move it around.

had some 40’ 10 awg gauge 4 strand wiring left over from a project
That is "cordage". That is not allowed in walls, it can only be used as a flexible cord between an appliance and a plug, or socket and plug if building an extension cord. (or in rare cases between an appliance and a hardwired connection, where that appliance might have a lot of vibration or move around a lot).

"I want to go to the dryer outlet and then swap plugs, or better yet, NOT swap plugs".

OK then no need for a $50 splitter from dodgy Amazon. Just install another 14-30 socket (or 6-30) right next to the existing one using my earlier advice. No limit to the number of 30A sockets on a 30A circuit.

If I can see a YouTube I can do it however having a hard time finding anything on this specific topic. A lot on wiring 4 wires appliance to 3 prong plug but not the other way around.
Following advice on Youtube is almost as scary as buying cheap Cheese on Amazon. Youtubers are largely idiots - their so-called "qualifications" are that they have video cam, lights, editing software and know how to "play the Youtube ranking game". As such, dangerous half-wits like ElectricianU or HandyDadTV get elevated above true experts like Benjamin Sahlstrom and John Ward. You don't know the difference, so "more glitzy" seems "more correct".

The deal is, if an appliance doesn't need neutral and you plug it into a socket with neutral, all is fine. However if an appliance does need neutral, and you plug it into a socket without neutral, the appliance (or RV) destroys itself for lack of neutral. That's why the plugs and sockets are setup to make that impossible. Don't Break It.

  • It is perfectly fine to put either a NEMA 6-30 or 14-30 plug on your heater. Your heater doesn't need neutral so if it gets neutral from a 14-50, doesn't matter.
  • An adapter cord with a 14-30 plug and a 6-30 socket is perfectly fine and can be UL Listed. The reverse will fry stuff.
 
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