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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
After installing my kitchen base cabinets, I will need to run electric for the built in microwave and switch to control the over head lighting. Some of the wires will be under the cabinets behind the kick plate and others will run up through the cabinet to a switch. Do I have to use conduit throughout? If so, either flexible metal or flexible plastic "liquid-tight" conduit? Should I avoid the kick plate area altogether and try to run in the back of the cabinet? Thanks.

All wiring will be in the peninsula cabinetry.
 

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How is it going to get damaged and along with if water gets in there, your cabinets would go, before the wiring.

It is not normal to pull up wire along the backs of the cabinets, since you have to have the box in the wall, cannot use the recessed outlets or switches on the counters.

All of the wiring should have been done before any cabinets and counters went in.
 

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It should have been ran like I stated before the cabinets and counters got put in. When you take the wire through, I would personally run 12/2 MC with the THHN/THWN already in it. As for the switch, do you plan on using it for lighting or the Microwave. You do not need it for the Microwave.
 

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MC or AC cable has always had THHN/THWN insulated conductors. Being you didn't prewire the application just run the cable thru the cabinets tucked as far back as possible. Flexible metal conduit (greenfield), ENT conduit (smurf tube) could also be used or MC cable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
It should have been ran like I stated before the cabinets and counters got put in. When you take the wire through, I would personally run 12/2 MC with the THHN/THWN already in it. As for the switch, do you plan on using it for lighting or the Microwave. You do not need it for the Microwave.
The cabinets are not installed yet. Is the idea to position them into place first, run the wires and then secure them? Not really seeing the advantage to this. Switch is not for microwave.

I usually use flexible metal conduit as tucked into a corner as possible. I don't use mc because with flex you can have more wires with less foot print. I've never seen mc with THHN/THWN in it.
Do I have to use THHN? or can I feed standard 12/2 and 14/2 through the conduit/tube?

MC or AC cable has always had THHN/THWN insulated conductors. Being you didn't prewire the application just run the cable thru the cabinets tucked as far back as possible. Flexible metal conduit (greenfield), ENT conduit (smurf tube) could also be used or MC cable.
Will look into the smurf tubing- looks like it would deb easier to work with than MC.
 

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Blue Smurf tube is what is used. In this case, it is going to stick out like a sore thumb and is also very hard to route like you want to.

THHN/THWN is always inside Ac & MC flex. Plus it is smaller in diameter and can be painted to blend into the cabinet color to kind of hide it.

You want the wire pulled with the excess rolled up to allow you to feed it as you put in the cabinets, before securing them. Once you get the wire ran and cabinets in, before counter goes on, cut to length and put in the box.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Blue Smurf tube is what is used. In this case, it is going to stick out like a sore thumb
It will be "hidden" inside the cabinet.

is also very hard to route like you want to.
there wont be any bends; two straight pieces and a junction box

You want the wire pulled with the excess rolled up to allow you to feed it as you put in the cabinets, before securing them. Once you get the wire ran and cabinets in, before counter goes on, cut to length and put in the box.
Can the blue smurf tube that is prewired connect to a junction box that is getting power from a 14/2 or 12/2? In other words, I dont have to run the blue smurf tube back to the panel, do I?
 

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We already know how you are going to run it. It is easier to use the AC or MC as I have stated.

Blue Smurftube is too big for what you want to do. It is for protecting Romex in Metal Stud walls and Dropped ceilings, along with used for A/V and Ethernet wiring.
 

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The lighting cannot be on the same circuit as the kitchen receptacles.

There is nothing wrong with sleeving a cable inside Smurf tube. It does not need to run back to the panel.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Just run it how it will work for you. Nothing ever gets ran in a straight line, because there will always be something in the way.
Thanks but what I am wondering based on my diagram, is it possible to only have one line between the junction boxes or is that impossible because of the outlet that is between the switch and the light.
 

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If this is in the kitchen you'd need B. Two separate circuits, one for lighting and one for the receptacle. Which is why I prefer single conductor in flexible metal conduit. You can sleeve romex in it but it isn't easy. You can use ENT but it isn't as easy as FMC.

I challenge anyone who thinks mc has THHN/THWN-2 in it to strip the jacket and post a pic of the tape marking the wire type. If anyone has pvc coated mc then you'll beat me. Everyone who doesn't have coated mc has THHN only.
 
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