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Discussion Starter #1
We would like to use wireless interconnected units (Kidde RF-SM-DC) for our smoke detector requirements.

From what I can gather, wireless units are allowed under the code providing that it complies with "NFPA 23.16 Special Requirements for Low-Power Radio (Wireless) Systems".

Can someone clarify this? Our city is using IBC 2009.
 

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Is this for personal use or a rental situation?
A brief Google suggests these are Ionization alarms.
If that is correct do yourself and/or your tenants a favor and get either photoelectric alarms, or duel alarms. Most people who die in fires die from smoke inhalation not flames. A photoelectric alarm will give a warning much faster for smoldering smokey fires. People have been known to die from smoke inhalation before an ionization alarm goes off.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
They are ionization alarms. Thanks for the heads up on that.

Still would like to get clarification on whether wireless alarms are allowable under IBC 2009 code.
 

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Call the local building inspector. Does IBC 2009 recognize or reference NFPA 72.16?

We have an account that uses wireless alarm for their property. They have their own radio tower that receives and sends emergency and non-emergency signals from 15 fire sprinkler systems and normal communications to and from a bunch of hand held radios. I like the system because I know immediately if the sprinkler systems have been received and sent. Each sprinkler system has a voice speaker next to the sprinkler controls.

The alarm company we use has customers with and w/o Poco. They have cell reception which interacts with the alarm panel, sending signal to the owner of the property. Signals may include fire, intrusion, high and low temp and water signals. Solar powers the batteries.

There are alarm systems that have smoke detectors with 9V batteries that send a signal to a panel. The panel then sends a signal to the notification devices. Notification devices are normally 110V powered.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Called them and waiting for call back. I believe 2012 code requires hard wired power but treats wireless interconnect same as wired (red wire) interconnect. So, as long as units are powered by 120v and have battery backup, the interconnect signals (one device goes off, they all go off) can be wireless (rf or wifi) or wired.

The nest protect is one device that is available in 120v or 9v powered versions. However, the interconnect for both is wireless. The install instructions for the hard wired 120v model specifically state to terminate the red wire from supply line.
 
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