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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious which is the prefered way to get the electrical cable through the conduit, and why?

I see some pull a rope through as they glue the conduit and pull the wire when done.

Others feed the cable through each individual piece of conduit as they go along.

Thanks in advance for your answers.
 

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Feeding the wire as you go is against code. The glue could damage the wires.
Feeding the rope as you go or after is your choice. Most electricians will feed the rope after.
 

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Just curious which is the prefered way to get the electrical cable through the conduit, and why?

I see some pull a rope through as they glue the conduit and pull the wire when done.

Others feed the cable through each individual piece of conduit as they go along.

Thanks in advance for your answers.
the proper method is to pull it through but for short runs, pushing it is okay as well. all depends on the conductor size, conduit diameter, where the bends are (it is often easier to pull from A to B than B to A), etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A cowork said the rural electric company instructed them to feed the wire as they go. That surprised me.
 

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Just curious which is the prefered way to get the electrical cable through the conduit, and why?

I see some pull a rope through as they glue the conduit and pull the wire when done.

Others feed the cable through each individual piece of conduit as they go along.

Thanks in advance for your answers.

Usually when you see them put the conductors in as they lay the pipe will mean the run of pipe is too long to put a fish tape in, or blow a jetline in to later. Not a good wiring practice really but it works, especially for POCO long lateral services where they cannot put pull boxes in. .
 

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A few methods I have used with success are:

  1. Metal fish tape. Push the fish tape through the conduit. Assuming you need to pull three wires - black, white, and green - wrap and tape one wire (e.g., green) around the fish tape. Then an inch or two down, tape another wire (e.g., white). Then another inch or two down, tape the last wire. It works best to have one person pull while another squeezes the wires together where they enter the conduit.
  2. Twine. I like using masonry twine because it seems stronger. You could pull it through while putting the conduit together. Another method that works well is to cut a plastic bag into a square and using some twine, create a little parachute. At the other end of the run, use your shop vac to pull the twine through the conduit. You can either use the twine to pull the fish tape or the wires through the conduit.
 

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Electrical Contractor
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Just curious which is the prefered way to get the electrical cable through the conduit, and why?

I see some pull a rope through as they glue the conduit and pull the wire when done.

Others feed the cable through each individual piece of conduit as they go along.

Thanks in advance for your answers.
If this is for your 200 amp service to the future cabin and temp rv power. How far are you going and what size conductors and conduit are you using.

The pull rope method is much easier. Than trying to get that wire through as you go if you use wire lube and it dries before you finish your run it will get harder as you go. And from what I hear getting glue on the wires is not a good idea. I have been meaning to put some on a URD cable and post what happens.
 

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Assuming you need to pull three wires - black, white, and green - wrap and tape one wire (e.g., green) around the fish tape. Then an inch or two down, tape another wire (e.g., white). Then another inch or two down, tape the last wire.
This works great for short distances but if it is a long pull I would strip the 3 wires and twist them together. Leave one long and make a hook with it and put it on the fish tape and tape it up. Doing it this way there is very little chance of the wires coming off, in the first method there is chance when your pulling that you will start only pulling the one wire that is attached to the fish tape.
 

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Install the conduit system completely first, then pull in the wires. This is how its done. This is how professionals do it. I have never seen one decent/real electrician do it in sections or any other way. Besides the NEC says its the right way.
 

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JOATMON
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As noted above....wire goes in 'after' the conduit is done....

For short runs...you can usually push the wire through....but they need to be pretty straight....if you have more than 1 90....forget it...your going to have to pull.

2 ways to pull wire through...

1. Fish tape.

2. Vacuum.....take a wad of cloth...tie a string around it..drop it in the conduit...use a shop vac at the other end...suck the wad through...use string to pull wire through.

Once you understand that any short cuts taken usually end up not working....you resign yourself to just doing it right in the first place....
 

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I'm in the process of laying 140' of 2" conduit. Working by myself, do you see any issue with pulling 4 wires one at a time? Thinking that pulling all 4 at once could be a chore for that distance.
 

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Pull all the conductors together at one time.
 

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JOATMON
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Pull all the conductors together at one time.
This^^^^

If you do them one at a time...1st and 2nd wire go ok...after that, it starts getting tough...because now your dealing wit the friction of the wires against each other and the conduit...

If your concerned about length...pull a string through...mark both ends...pull it out leaving another pull string in....then use that string to set the length of your wires.

DO NOT tape the wires together...especially inside the conduit....the only tape is on the end where you have the pull string attached.

Now...this is me...but string is cheap....so when I have a long run like this, I will typically don't cut the pull string...I tape the wires to it...and then pull the wire along with more pull string. Reason being....if for some reason the wire slips on the pull string, your not pulling the wire off the pull string. And when it's done...I still have a pull string in the conduit with the wire just in case I need to pull another wire.

Nothing is more fun thatn getting to within 5' of your pull and the string coming off....which means you pull all your wire back out and run your pull string through the conduit again.
 

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stranded conductors you can remove some of the strands of each conductor to make your pulling head smaller then tape it up really well. Make sure you have extra wire and it will work well. You can also use a tubing cutter to remove the insulation and some of the outer strands. Your pulling head being smaller diameter than all the wires you are pulling will help. Rather have leftover wire than not enough.
 

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I use a swivel leader to help keep the twist out of long pulls,every one else pretty much covered it,now get to work.
 
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