DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello all! First post here so I hope I'm not breaking any rules.

Situation:

The window:

-Single pane
-Wood
-Original 1928
-Decent Shape. No apparent rotting and recently painted.

I have a bedroom that I've had closed off and the vents closed in so it had been getting very cold about 40 degrees. The other day I noticed that there was extreme condensation on the window in this room and there was a bit of water behind the paint on the wall next to the window. It looks like the condensation had pooled and then run into the wall through the window frame.

Inspecting the window I noticed that there was a decent sized gap at the bottom between the glazing putty and the window pane and the rest of the putty seemed to be loosing it's seal all the way around.

I inspected the exterior and noticed there was a crack in the mortar of the brick wall right behind the wall that sustained water damage. It not a large crack but I will definitely be repairing it.

I've since allowed heat to this room and added a dehumidifier to the house. This seems to have taken care of the condensation issue for the most part.

Questions:

1. Can I simply add a little putty over the existing putty to patch the minor gaps between the existing putty and the pane of glass or is it absolutely necessary to remove the existing putty? I'd prefer just to patch it a bit since it appears to be in good shape aside from it having pulled away from the pane of glass a bit.

2. Is the slightly damaged putty the cause or a symptom?

3. Do you think the cracked mortar on the exterior brick has played a role in the condensation and/or the water damage on the interior wall?

Thanks for the advice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,828 Posts
1928 single glazed windows will frost or sweat (temperature dependent) no matter what you do. :)

You can touch up the glazing with an acrylic caulk and use silicone for any mortar joints but neither of those will cure the prblem.
 
  • Like
Reactions: brownSys

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,398 Posts
To answer your final questions first :

1 . Removing all the window glazing (putty) & re-glazing would produce a much better cosmetic result but isn't necessary .

2 . The cracked/crumbling glazing is the result of age . It also has little ( if any) effect on water penetration .

3 . Unless you have major masonary problems (brick veneer movement , damage , other) a little missing or cracked mortar doesn't sound like the problem........

However , don't have enough info :

1. Can you post pics ?

2. What is your location & how cold is the room ?

3 . Your description is vague . You say you have water "behind the paint , on the wall NEXT to the window " ? If it is beside the window (& not under it) the window may not be part of the problem .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
3 . Your description is vague . You say you have water "behind the paint , on the wall NEXT to the window " ? If it is beside the window (& not under it) the window may not be part of the problem .

Thank you so much for the help. Here are detailed images of what's going on.




Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18 Show Content






Almost forgot to answer your questions.

2. Missouri. Room was getting to 40 or lower.

3. Pictures should clarify. After taking the pictures and really looking closely I'm guessing this has nothing to do with the window and is actually a leak through the wall from the deteriorated mortar. The reason I say that is because the shape of the damage appears to mirror the crack in the mortar. We also had a record amount of rain fall the week before I noticed this so that may be it. Your thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
How about a picture of the wood sill that is between the primary window in the storm window as well?

Is this problem new with the winter weather and condensation or is this an issue that existed during the rainy season?





Is this problem new with the winter weather and condensation or is this an issue that existed during the rainy season?
I believe this just occurred for the first time a week or two ago. To my knowledge it only happened one time. I noticed it one morning because the comforter on the bed next to the wall was wet. I then pulled the bed back and found a wet wall and tons of condensation on the inside of the window.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,398 Posts
I could be wrong , but your 1st & 2nd pics (of the wall) doesn't look like water damage . It looks more like a crack in the wall .

As far as the the comforter & wall actually being wet ,OK , not being sarcastic here , but you stated it happened once , about a week ago . Was there a strong wind (possibly from an unusual direction) with the rain that day ? Was the "storm"window (the aluminum , outer one) closed ??? I have seen rain blow through modern , single sash insulated windows . Storm windows will usually knock the wind load down & prevent blowing rain from being forced into the home . But not if they are left open !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I could be wrong , but your 1st & 2nd pics (of the wall) doesn't look like water damage . It looks more like a crack in the wall .

As far as the the comforter & wall actually being wet ,OK , not being sarcastic here , but you stated it happened once , about a week ago . Was there a strong wind (possibly from an unusual direction) with the rain that day ? Was the "storm"window (the aluminum , outer one) closed ??? I have seen rain blow through modern , single sash insulated windows . Storm windows will usually knock the wind load down & prevent blowing rain from being forced into the home . But not if they are left open !

Thanks for the input.

I'm quite sure it is water damage, at least to some extent. The paint is bubbled out from water and the paint around the trim near the floor is pealed up from water damage. When I initially noticed it the wall was still wet.

At that point you could even see and feel droplets of water trapped behind the paint in various spots. These droplets were more below the window than at the side. The droplets are no longer visible though since I assume they adsorbed into the plaster behind them and the deformation to the paint is unnoticeable.

There is definitely a crack on the other side of that wall in the bricks mortar though, which may be partly responsible for the appearance of the damage.

The day I noticed this there was no rain if I recall correctly. This is why I assumed the moisture came from the excessive condensation on the window. There may have been unusual wind but it occurred over night so I'm not sure.

The storm window is and has been closed. It seems to be in adequate shape and I don't see any big issues with how it is installed.

Thanks again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
What is the wall construction type?
Not sure if I understand what you are asking but the wall is plaster. I assume there is a wood "frame" (not sure if that's the right word) behind that and brick behind the frame. It seems to be the original walls from 1928.

Any slope on that pre cast will?
Pre cast will? Do you mean the exterior concrete sill? I'll have to check.


Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Precast sill. Sorry....autocorrect fail.

What's the pitch on that. Doesn't look that good.
I put a level on it and the pitch looked fine.

I ended up completing some re-point work on the exterior brick with the crack. Hopefully that takes care of the problem.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top