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Basically I have an awkward window, high up in an apartment, multiple sliding windows and screens (horizontal) and some edges are not flush with others.

I've spent a good part of the day figuring out how I'm going to mount this thing. I came up with an idea for a frame, it will do the trick, but it will be much easier if I can just lay the AC flat instead of dealing with a 5 degree tilt.

The main problem is the exterior of my window. Too steep a drop, too steep a slope, and I'd prefer not to go anchoring things into the exterior. I don't have many tools or space to work with either.

I can make a nice square frame wooden frame thats secure and holds the AC unit well.
 

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#1 HAWKEYE FAN
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it is very important to have a tilt to the rear, unless you want loads of water dripping back into your wall. Normally about 3/8" will suffice.
 

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Even if you can get just a slight tilt to it and drill (not punch) a few holes in the bottom you should be fine. that would allow a good portion of the water to drip out. Put a towel under the A/c though, cause it gunna get wet! haha Unless of course you would like a slip and slide in your home.
 

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Learning by Doing
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Even if you can get just a slight tilt to it and drill (not punch) a few holes in the bottom you should be fine. that would allow a good portion of the water to drip out. Put a towel under the A/c though, cause it gunna get wet! haha Unless of course you would like a slip and slide in your home.
BE CAREFUL DRILLING INTO YOUR A/C UNIT. Ask me how I know..... It's cause I discharged all the coolant out of my AC by letting my drill slip just a tiny bit. What a mess.....:censored: Not to mention it's not really good for you to touch/breath it.


You need the 'tilt' or you are going to cause a major moisture problem that is EASY to miss until it's done some damage (ask me how I know - stupid former HomeOwner).

Don't just stuff a towel around it - you'll end up with the same moisture problem.....
 

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Even if you can get just a slight tilt to it and drill (not punch) a few holes in the bottom you should be fine. that would allow a good portion of the water to drip out. Put a towel under the A/c though, cause it gunna get wet! haha Unless of course you would like a slip and slide in your home.
Actually the newer units use the water to help cool the unit to make them more efficient. Punching holes is not what you would do with one of these, and also allows for the metal to rust quicker.
 

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Actually the newer units use the water to help cool the unit to make them more efficient. Punching holes is not what you would do with one of these, and also allows for the metal to rust quicker.
Greg - You are totally right. I've got four (used to have five :wink:) that do it this way. However, when the heat and humidity go up the 'bath' of water overflowed everywhere. The designed system allowed excess water to dump directly in the center of the unit - right into my window :furious:

I elected to sacrifice efficiency and possibly lifespan to insure that the water is no longer draining into my window well when the temps and humidity go above 95F.
 

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#1 HAWKEYE FAN
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Even if you can get just a slight tilt to it and drill (not punch) a few holes in the bottom you should be fine.
dumb dumb idea, unless you know exactly where every refrigerant line runs. I've seen many brand new air conditioners ruined by this form of stupidity.
 

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Wire Chewer
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If I was to drill a hole what I'd do is do it near the front or side, and not under it, and a few mm up that way some water remains in the pan to act as extra cooling as it's designed. In fact, find out the highest you can go before the water overflows where you don't want. Give some play in case it's not 100% level. Then drill a small hole, and run a small piece of pipe with 90 elbow pointing down (CPVC, or even PEX) so it sticks out, that way the water will come out of the pipe cleanly instead of possibly dripping down and under the unit.

You need to know exactly where you are drilling so you don't hit a refrigerant line, as mentioned. Best to just open up the whole unit and inspect it and decide on the best place to drill. Once you pass the pipe through the hole apply some waterproof caulk or other sealant to seal it in well and you should be set. I did something similar with my dehumidifier so I don't have to always empty it. In my case I put a hose bib and attached a hose, that way I can still turn it off if I decide to use the unit where there's no drain. For an AC, don't need to go that far. In fact even a 1/4" tube should do.
 

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Leah, the tilt can still be done, but as you stated, very gradual, not so much that it causes the unit to not run correctly. The brackets that hold the bottom of the unit help to secure the unit, so it stays in the window frame, and gives the proper tilt.
 

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ya gotta be careful draining to much water cause now they are engineered to "spray" water to the outside coils to help cool the refridgerant thus allowing for more efficient cooling. the drain holes are positioned strategically to allow some water drainage while allowing some water to settle below the outside coils so the fan can "lift" the water onto the coils.
 

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I have had a problem with algae/bacterial growth clogging drain tubes. I make it a habit now to clear them when I clean the filters.
 

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Unless that condensate is going to drip over a common walk way or door way I would forget abot getting fancy with extra piping.
The unit is designed to get rid of extra condensate.You instructions say 5 degree tilt .Well that fine if you are some engineer or super carpenter but a simple piece of hard wood under the unit on the slope would be just fine.I always put a SLIGHT tilt on it as water will always follow a tilt of any degree.
I usually tried for about a 1/4 inch .You get that tilt with various size pieces of hard wood..Now you can lock it in place with another piece of hardwood attached to the window frame.
Don't make a project out of a simple job.,,,,,,K.I.S.S.
 

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jschaben
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I don't think the 5* is terribly critical. You do want it tilted back a little to keep the condensation from draining inside the the house. Poking holes in it doesn't sound like a very good solution either.
I just installed two Fridgidaire 12K btu window units. About 1/2" tilt front to back. Excess condensation weeps, runs in this weather, out of a 1/2" hole about 8" back from the front along the left edge of the case. It is dripping on the outside window ledge but it is well painted. I may stick a drain line in that hole though. Wouldn't be a major project to do.:whistling2:
 

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I don't think the 5* is terribly critical. You do want it tilted back a little to keep the condensation from draining inside the the house. Poking holes in it doesn't sound like a very good solution either.
I just installed two Fridgidaire 12K btu window units. About 1/2" tilt front to back. Excess condensation weeps, runs in this weather, out of a 1/2" hole about 8" back from the front along the left edge of the case. It is dripping on the outside window ledge but it is well painted. I may stick a drain line in that hole though. Wouldn't be a major project to do.:whistling2:
The Friedrich I just installed called for a 1/2 inch tilt front to back (installation instructions). It's drain hole came with a plug adapted to take a tube.
 
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