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Discussion Starter #1
I have the garage entrance door that has the 5/8" thick t1-11 plywood on top of the regular door as the photos show below. The door feels rather heavy when I open and close the door.

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Will the plywood make the door too heavy for the door hinge, jamb, and the jack stud and thus create problems in the future? Is it better to remove the plywood from the door?

The plywood was added on top of the door by the association last time like 10 to 15 years ago or more when they replaced the damaged plywood on the outside wall. Previous to that, there was no plywood on the door and it felt light when opening and closing the door. This question is related to this project. My neighbor garage entrance door does not have this plywood on the door.

Thank you very much.
 

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Shouldn't affect the framing if it was framed well.
You could replace the two inner hinge screws on each one at a time
with some 3" deck screws, or remove the T-111 from the door, or both.
 

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Big Dog
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I can only give you the benefit of my own experience.

I built a 10x12 foot storage shed sheathed in T-111. Even though it was just a shed, I built it using home building methods which means the doorway has king studs with a header on top of the jack stud.

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The doorway is five-feet wide so I built 2 doors each 2.5 feet wide. In wanting to keep the uniformity, I used T-111 facing over 2x4 frame. Each door was hung with three 4.8" x 4.25" hinges each rated 48lbs.

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I replaced the included screws with 3" screws and used carriage bolts to secure the wide plate section to the doors.

Initially, everything was fine but after about 5-years the doors were beginning to sag a bit. I re-did the screws in the frames and tried securing steel cables diagonally across each door to help counter the weight but it did not help much. In another couple years the doors were sagging to the point they were dragging on the threshold.

I ended up building new doors and used 1/2" plywood over 2x4 framing. I used the same hinges hung in the same manner. The new doors weighed almost half what the original ones did. So far, I have not had any further issues with sagging.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you HuckPie and Drachenfire very much for the comments.

So, the door weight for sure makes a difference. I do not want any trouble with the door in the future, and I am thinking of removing the plywood.

Thank you.
 

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Big Dog
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You did not indicate if the T-111 was PT. It is a factor as PT is heavier.
 

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Oil in the hinges may help. If hinge screws work themselves loose, replace with longer screws into the frame studs. Meeting surfaces may rot faster because, especially, top joint is open. If caulked, maybe ok.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you Drachenfire and carpdad very much for the comments.

Drachenfire, do you mean pressure-treated T1-11 with the word PT? I am not sure if it is PT or not. Is there any way to find out?

carpdad, I am going to replace the stud that joins the door jamb or frame. So, I do not have any problems yet. I was asking if the door is fairly heavy with the additional t1-11 plywood on top of the regular door, I wanted to find out if it would make a problem down the road. Thank you for the valuable tips for the door.

Thank you.
 

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Big Dog
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Thank you Drachenfire and carpdad very much for the comments.

Drachenfire, do you mean pressure-treated T1-11 with the word PT? I am not sure if it is PT or not. Is there any way to find out?

carpdad, I am going to replace the stud that joins the door jamb or frame. So, I do not have any problems yet. I was asking if the door is fairly heavy with the additional t1-11 plywood on top of the regular door, I wanted to find out if it would make a problem down the road. Thank you for the valuable tips for the door.

Thank you.
Pressure treated is green in color and is noticeably heavier than non-pressure treated.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Pressure treated is green in color and is noticeably heavier than non-pressure treated.
Thank you Drachenfire very much for the information.

Because it is painted on the surface, it is hard to tell. Is it green on both sides of the T1-11?

Thank you.
 
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