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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our covered patio was turned into a finished room by someone who used to work in construction. While the result looks beautiful inside, I have a concern on the exterior. The original concrete patio floor was not raised and looks to me to be about 2 1/2 inches above grade level. Siding was applied to the wall nearly to the level of the outer patio floor. A French drain runs the length of the adjacent yard.

Here is where it gets kind of sticky. Because of concern that blowing water might still seep in under the outer wall, a long piece of aluminum was bent lengthwise at a right angle, nailed lengthwise to the wall and also to the outer concrete floor, then caulked along both seams.

I am trying diligently to explain this and am sorry, but I am not overly familiar with construction terminology. Please bear with me.

Lastly, 13" tile was applied outside and was well grouted, particularly so against the wall where the siding is attached.

By the way, this is not a load bearing wall, but I am concerned that this was not the right way to do this. All new construction I have looked at has nothing even resembling this job. The level of concrete always seems to be higher.

I watched the interior construction as it went up and it appeared to be fine. While the sole plate is made from treated wood, what is going to happen if water does seep in when blowing rain occurs? And, is the only way to fix this is to totally tear out the wall and start over? Is there anything at all we can do to improve this situation?

Thank you for your patience.
Scarlett
 

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we need a picture or a rough drawing before you get a " frankly Scarlet, ..."

so youre worried about water being blown up and under the sill? Water that didnt seep into the french drain? Does it puddle around the once covered patio?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I will try and take a picture tomorrow when the light is good. I believe I saw instructions somewhere here on how to post pictures.

The water sits on the outside tile when it rains and sometimes the wind blows it hard against that wall. I have no idea how much protection the grout offers from seeping through the bottom of the wall. None has run inside though, at least not yet. The outside tile is placed at a very slight downward angle, so much runs off into the drain.

Dave-The inspector came out only for the initial. He did not return for a final inspection and I have been afraid to call. This guy who finished this was trying to do us a favor by straightening out a mess from contractor #1. I don't even want to go there...

I am worried that this will interfere with our ability to sell our home later on. My husband thinks the room is beautiful and therefore OK... Although it is stable and quite attractive, it is what lies out of view that concerns me. He knows nothing at all about construction and I am not far behind him.

I will get a picture and post it.

I appreciate your help. I feel like such a fool for ending up in this situation.

Thank you,
scarlett
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Have pictures, but am having difficulty transferring from camera to Mac. Will post as soon as possible.
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am having trouble posting these pictures. They are .jpg files, but each appears to exceed the max # of kb posted by Cole at the top of this forum, which is 100kb.

I am using a MacBook Pro and am about as knowledgeable with this as I am with construction... The .jpg pics are on my desktop.

Any ideas on how to do this?

Thank you
 

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In Windows you can click on an image and resize it (make it smaller). On a MAC, I don't know what program is needed to resize it. Perhaps if you open it, the program that let's you view it would allow you to save it with a lower resolution or size?
 

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The first post on the top of the "Building and Construction" page is, "How to post a picture".
Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you Bob and Ron. I saw the directions on how to post. The problem is that I am using a Mac and the number of kb exceeds the max you can post.
I will try what Ron suggested, or if this does not work, go to the Apple store.

Thank you.
 

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You should be able to adjust the picture size on one of the hosting sites.
Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
OK. Maybe this will work. The pictures are on my profile-Click About me, Albums, Patio Addition. There are 3. One shows the side of the house and a small amount of the outer floor. One shows the tiled outside floor itself and the last one shows the depth of the edge of the outer patio, probably around 2 1/2 inches. (Please note here, this is 2 1/2 inches or so above the grade. I have no idea how much concrete is beneath the grade-this was part of the original patio when the house was built.)

There is a French drain running along the edge, probably about a foot and a half out from the outer edge.

If you cannot view the portion of the house where the tile meets the side, or you need a closer view, please let me know and I will attempt a closer shot. It is hard to get a very big shot of the side of the house, since I am backed up against a fence attempting to shoot.
 

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That looks very nice
Myself I would not have gone all the way to the floor with windows
How much of an overhang is there above (roof)
Where are you located?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for responding Dave. Sorry, we have been out-of-town. We live in the Dallas area.

I measured the overhang, which extends about 22 inches out, plus another 6 or 6 1/2 inches for guttering we added after construction. The roof on this house is sloped, but unlike the new homes built now, it is not sloped at such a sharp angle. This house was built in the late '70s.

We did not realize the importance of this guttering, until the first really hard rain after the room was completed. Looking out from the inside, it was more like I could imagine standing on the back side of Niagra Falls trying to focus. Picture people standing out there with umbrellas, in a downpour, soaking wet, trying to deflect some of the water...

If any of you have any ideas on whether this could be a problem, please post something if you possibly have time. Tiling a little bit up the wall looks nice, but my concern is if the water can leak through and damage the soleplate.

Thank you, I really appreciate your patience and input,
Scarlett
 

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It looks like it was put together right
As long as the windows are sealed correctly, as long as they drain
I wouldn't be too worried
From your description it appears it was flashed correctly
So the flashing is under the tile at the bottom of the window?
Do you get heavy rains (barring hurricanes) where that tile could be under water?



 

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How long has this particular construction been in existance? And so far you haven't had any water issues.
When the construction was planned, wasn't this aspect detailed? What is under the tile? There should have been a construction method used to deal with this issue. What was it?
Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yes, the flashing is under the tile. It is L shaped, so that half is behind the tile backing going up the wall, the other half is buried beneath the tile on the outside floor. The grout, or whatever they use on the floor to hold tile down, was built up close to the house and then sloped down slightly towards the outer edge.

I can't say that the water stands, but the rain and wind do drive it against the wall. The water hits the wall and drains off to the yard, in heavy rains.

The reason the windows are so low, is because the roof is low... It is barely over my head.

This room is a 2 sided project, marvel, nightmare??? This is because it fits beneath a roof, with the house enclosing it on 2 sides. You see one side-the long one. Think of it as a rectangle with 2 sides needing protection-a long side and a short side. The short side has tiled floor (and tile backing up the wall part of the way), but no flashing. This side is covered by the roof, which probably extends about 10 feet. It gets wet some, but moreso if I hose off the area. Maybe this should have had flashing too.

I learned a lot with this project. One: sometimes it is just easier to move if you need more room. Two: do NOT have porcelain tile put outside in an area where it gets wet... Looks nice, but "slick" on outdoor porcelain is bad news if you fall...

I have not even described the problems with the first contractor. Let me just offer a brief description of the "final." One week after completion, it rained and poured in both skylights by the bucket.. He was standing on the roof fighting with the company who manufactured the skylights, both blaming each other for the mess... Eventually, we gave up and had the house reroofed...

It would probably have been cheaper to move...
 

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If its caulked & sealed it should stand up to the blowing rain
I had a poorly caulked window on the 2nd floor at an Apt leak

Just keep an eye on the caulk over the years
Hopefullly they used a 20-30 year caulk
But caulk will eventually fail
As long as proper maintenance is performed it should be OK
I have over a dozen skylights in my house
Each has been carefully flashed & sealed - but they can still eventually leak.
Enjoy the new room
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
The downspout drains into the French drain. I see it looks like there is a hose in front of it. Actually, that is the soaker house that is supposed to drip around the house to keep the foundation from moving in Texas heat.

There is also a downspout near the other end of the porch that drains into the French drain also. Some of the houses built in this time frame have big sloping roofs. When it rains, the wash off is extremely heavy.

I am concerned over the way this was flashed. I have only seen flashing, other than around a chimney, used in a house at ground level one other time and it appeared to be some type of rubber. Do you think aluminum applied in the manned described is OK, as long as it is well caulked?

Thanks,

scarlett

My next project hopefully, will be a pond...
 

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I do not think you have anything to worry about. The question I have is- was there good drainage away from that area before the convert. If you have good drainage away from the house you should be ok. That being said, you can always slope the ground away a little more. I live in the Dallas area too, And if I recall most foundations should be required to have a three inch or greater grade. I am only on my second house as an owner. One thing I really looked at when buying both of my house's is the soil line around the foundation. Water can enter if it tops your cement where it meets you first brick layer. Every now and then after I first got into a house I would go look around during the rain to see how the drainage was doing. If you see an area where you think the soil is to high around the foundation, or to much water standing just remove some soil and slope it away from house.

Does the french drain run out to the curb. If it does and it drains good that should be fine. Otherwise to be on safe side I would have a solid drain run and get the water out of there.
 
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