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My nickname for my boat's previous owner is "old flat head" because, based on the fasteners he used, I assume that's the only kind of screwdriver he owned.
He may have previously owned or worked on wooden boats.
If you have ever had to remove wood planks or trim where the screws are covered with a bung, you love slotted screws. They are much easier to clean when the screw is filled with glue at the bottom of a bung hole. Same thing goes for screws that have been painted over with hard marine paints.

Screws that have been set in hard woods for years can take quite a lot of torque to remove. If you are doing a bunch of them, using a brace with a slotted screwdriver bit is the way to go. It saves your wrist and your grip.
 

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I hate slotted screws and Phillips head second. And I don't use anything but a screwdriver on plates. My biggest gripe is the shitty screws we get today.
I wish we would go standard to square slot screws. A breeze to use.
 

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Visible Screws in "Cover Plates" ?
How archaic !

You may (or may not) believe that it has been demonstrated that it is not "beyond the whit of man" to "come up with" "Cover Plates" (etc.) which do not have any "visible screws" (Slotted, Philips or otherwise.).
Such devices are available in certain countries - while the same manufactures providing "devices" in these countries seem to choose not to make similar products available in other countries !

(For example, see the "wall switches", pictured here https://www.clipsal.com/products/2000-series )
Since "Clipsal Australia" is now owned by "Schneider Electric", that company easily could introduce such improved products in their other countries of operation, including those in North America.


Very interesting, never seen a device with six switches before. So if this is installed into a single gang box, it's going to be a challenge with box fill...one hot, six switched legs, one neutral, one ground, plus nuts...
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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Very interesting, never seen a device with six switches before. So if this is installed into a single gang box, it's going to be a challenge with box fill...one hot, six switched legs, one neutral, one ground, plus nuts...
That's not new, or even foreign only.

In the 90's, I was in a home built in the 50's that had all push button lighting switches.

Was called MODERN, or something similar 60 years ago.

This was in backwards Wyoming too.

ED
 

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That's not new, or even foreign only.

In the 90's, I was in a home built in the 50's that had all push button lighting switches.

Was called MODERN, or something similar 60 years ago.

This was in backwards Wyoming too.

ED
Interesting. But back in the 50s before we have the LED lights, if you have a single device that serves six fixtures, say six lights at 75W each, and all these wires and connections in a single gang box, wouldn't that be difficult in terms of box fill, and that device would need a heat sink because it can get hot?
 

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Very interesting, never seen a device with six switches before. So if this is installed into a single gang box, it's going to be a challenge with box fill...one hot, six switched legs, one neutral, one ground, plus nuts...
The "plates" can also be uses for "Extra Low Voltage" connectors (of various "types") and when so used "match" other wall-plates - such as socket outlets.
Gas Electronic device Gadget Electrical supply Machine

Even if used for (6) Light Switches, there would need be only at least one Neutral in (and one out) and one Ground in (and one out) only if the lights concerned were "supplied" via the switches.
If the switches were on loops from the lights, there would be no "need" for a "Neutral" (not YET required in Australia) and no need for a "Ground" - since there is nothing in that plastic plate or those switches to which to connect a Ground conductor.
Hence, a maximum of only 7 conductors would be "needed" (1 "Line" + 6 "Switched Lines"), since it is not required in Australia that all conductors supplying a "device" be within the same "sheath".

Because of this, 2 core (Line and Switched-Line) cable is available
Cable Elect 2core Twinact P/m 1.5mm Cacp05a1002wvab
and, also,
Single core cable
Cable Nexans Olex P/m 1.5mm AABP05A1001WTRD
(Because of the above, when a cable has X-Cores and an "Earth" this is always stated.
Olex 1.5mm Two Core and Earth Flat Lighting Cable )
These conductors are 1.5 mm² (CSA), which is almost #15 AWG, and is rated at 10 A - for the 240 V "Lighting" circuits used in Australia.
As can be seen in the pictures, the conductors used are "Stranded" and not "Solid".)


The switch connections all use set-screws and can "fit" at least two conductors, twisted together.
(In fact, when using only One conductor, it is best to double-over the end of the conductor to give the set-screw more surface to "bite-on".)

Unless it is an "Intermediate/Cross-Over" switch, each switch also has a spare "Loop" set-screw connection, which can be used to join other conductors - such as "Neutrals" - if required.
This tends to obviate any need to provide auxiliary connection devices, such as "twist on" wire connectors.
(See https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Typical_Australian_Rocker_Switch.jpg and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_switch )

It is unlikely that there would be any need for Auxiliary Connectors, except for one Earth/Ground connector - of the type shown in this picture - if required
Automotive lighting Rectangle Auto part Temperature Fashion accessory


(These "Earth" connectors have two screws because AS/NZS 3000 states
3,7.2.11 Earthing Conductors
........

(b) Tunnel-type connectors. All screws that are in direct contact with conductors in tunnel-type terminals shall be of the type designed not to cut the conductor.
Tunnel terminals shall be of the type having -
(i) two screws; or
(ii) one screw with an outside diameter not less than 80% of the tunnel diameter, or
(iii) the conductor clamped by suitable ferrules or plates in direct contact with the conductor.

Most such connectors used are those of option (i). )

That's not new, or even foreign only.

In the 90's, I was in a home built in the 50's that had all push button lighting switches.

Was called MODERN, or something similar 60 years ago.
They are not push-button switches - they are "rocker" switches (and all would be SPDT, unless Intermediate/Crossover)
 

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Slot screws were great for their time. That is another reason carpenters had a larger right arm. The mini yankee drill, and the yanke driver were the norm. NOT the brace and bit. Then came (hallelujah) the phillips screws. No more cut up finger tips, or cursing. Like going from standard to automatic. When your in the trades you don't remain a purist, you need to get the job done. Now, for the last 25-30 yrs I use square head (sq drive) wood screws, installing cabinetry. Another leap for man kind! And NEVER use phillips unless the head is specked by architect.
(I prefer the phillips drive on electric covers etc. They are faster/easier and my OCD is unaffected. For me it is a no brainer)
Here is a tid bit of history.
In 1908, square-drive screws were invented by Canadian P. L. Robertson (1879–1951), 28 years before Henry Phillips patented his Phillips head screws, which are also square-drive screws. The Robertson screw is considered the "first recess-drive type fastener practical for production usage." The design became a North American standard, as published in the "Industrial Fasteners Institute Book of Fastener Standards." A square-drive head on a screw is an improvement over the slot head because the screwdriver will not slip out of the screw's head during installation. The early 20th century Model T car made by the Ford Motor Company (one of Robertson's first customers) used over seven hundred Robertson screws.

Then there's the combos for those who can't decide.....😩
 

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Slot screws were great for their time. That is another reason carpenters had a larger right arm. The mini yankee drill, and the yanke driver were the norm. NOT the brace and bit. Then came (hallelujah) the phillips screws. No more cut up finger tips, or cursing. Like going from standard to automatic. When your in the trades you don't remain a purist, you need to get the job done. Now, for the last 25-30 yrs I use square head (sq drive) wood screws, installing cabinetry. Another leap for man kind! And NEVER use phillips unless the head is specked by architect.
(I prefer the phillips drive on electric covers etc. They are faster/easier and my OCD is unaffected. For me it is a no brainer)
Here is a tid bit of history.
In 1908, square-drive screws were invented by Canadian P. L. Robertson (1879–1951), 28 years before Henry Phillips patented his Phillips head screws, which are also square-drive screws. The Robertson screw is considered the "first recess-drive type fastener practical for production usage." The design became a North American standard, as published in the "Industrial Fasteners Institute Book of Fastener Standards." A square-drive head on a screw is an improvement over the slot head because the screwdriver will not slip out of the screw's head during installation. The early 20th century Model T car made by the Ford Motor Company (one of Robertson's first customers) used over seven hundred Robertson screws.

Then there's the combos for those who can't decide.....😩
The way I understand things, the Robertson drive didn't gain a foothold in the expanding auto industry of the day because he refused to sell his patent to Ford. Ford was looking for a head that was compatible with his new-fangled assembly line process, and the slot head certainly wasn't it.
 

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The way I understand things, the Robertson drive didn't gain a foothold in the expanding auto industry of the day because he refused to sell his patent to Ford. Ford was looking for a head that was compatible with his new-fangled assembly line process, and the slot head certainly wasn't it.
Philips just modified the English screw Reed and Prince, Freason Drive.
Lot's of boat builders use the R&P and people think that they are Philips that just don't fit right
Reed & Prince Frearson Drive vs Phillips – Fair Wind Fasteners
 

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I hate slotted screws and Phillips head second. And I don't use anything but a screwdriver on plates. My biggest gripe is the shitty screws we get today.
I use Torx head deck screws almost exclusively. For deck screws, drywall screws, nails... I don't even own nails. I also use then in historic restorations but only when they will be buried by T&G or roofing.

Honestly trying to bust loose ancient slotted screws is easier than trying to deal with cammed out Philips. Usually I can open up the slot with a Dremel moto-tool and get the correct size screwdriver into the slot.


Interesting. But back in the 50s before we have the LED lights, if you have a single device that serves six fixtures, say six lights at 75W each, and all these wires and connections in a single gang box, wouldn't that be difficult in terms of box fill, and that device would need a heat sink because it can get hot?
They may be switching 18 AWG low voltage wires in a relay based system.
 
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