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A "Handy Husband"
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Electrical cover plates from day 1 have used slotted screws while all other electrical devices have switched to Philips or Robertson screws. Why?
It would be some much easier if the screwdriver did not cam out so easily. Could use a power screw driver.
 

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Naildriver
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easier if the screwdriver did not cam out so easily
Never used a driver that cammed out on a switch plate. Actually never used a power driver at all on switch plates.
But like metal covers, the phillips head does make it easier to install without making sure the slot is vertical
 

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I like that reasoning aas to not having to have the slots straight. It means nothing to me, but to most customers it does.
As to power screwdrivers, you know that you can get slotted driver bits.
 

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Seems like using a straight screwdriver is a skill that has been mostly lost. I have never had a problem with these because my dad taught me the technique to keep it centered while twisting. But if you don't do it right you will ruin the screw head and then it becomes a real pain. Why do you need a power driver for a cover plate? I think you would crack the plate very easily.
 

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Electrical cover plates from day 1 have used slotted screws while all other electrical devices have switched to Philips or Robertson screws. Why?
It would be some much easier if the screwdriver did not cam out so easily. Could use a power screw driver.
the answer is simple,

slotted heads are more decorative, and look better, it is for asthetic purposes

I would never use a power tool for a cover plate, in fear of cracking it
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I total agree with Peter. A phillips head is not as clean as a straight head and if you are anal as I am you want the slot to be vertical, or horizontal on devices that are installed on the horizontal.
With a Philips you could go with. + or x I only use nylon midsized plates, you can't crack them.

Sent from my moto g power using Tapatalk
 

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the answer is simple,

slotted heads are more decorative, and look better, it is for asthetic purposes

I would never use a power tool for a cover plate, in fear of cracking it
Bingo on the aesthetics being the answer.

I always spring for nylon cover plates. Hard to break them. That said, screwing down a cover plate is a really easy job, and you don't want to use much torque.

If it bothers you, you could also go with screwless cover plates.
 

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Remodel and New Build GC
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Electrical cover plates from day 1 have used slotted screws while all other electrical devices have switched to Philips or Robertson screws. Why?
It would be some much easier if the screwdriver did not cam out so easily. Could use a power screw driver.
RJ....GREAT SUBJECT....And a Phillips is so much easier to land when you're old and it's in dark corner and you don't have your glasses and your hand shakes a little..!!!!!!

I think the NEC , who every three years has to invent a new code to keep their jobs, should be concerned with this.😁

And who are the idiots that think the slotted go vertical....OH sorry Larry and CestMoi 😀
 

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We could get a good argument going here; vertical or horizontal?

Personally, I don't care, but I do line them up so they're the same, just out of some sense of aesthetics.

What I don't understand is slotted screw heads on things like terminal blocks. Especially 12V terminals designed for a boat. Last week I was flat on my back in a tiny, cramped space trying to re-terminate a ring terminal overhead in among a tangle of wires. I think I dropped the screws at least 20 times. They'd bounce and often go somewhere inaccessible, starting a whole new project to find and retrieve them. Who thinks this is a good idea???
 

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We could get a good argument going here; vertical or horizontal?

Personally, I don't care, but I do line them up so they're the same, just out of some sense of aesthetics.

What I don't understand is slotted screw heads on things like terminal blocks. Especially 12V terminals designed for a boat. Last week I was flat on my back in a tiny, cramped space trying to re-terminate a ring terminal overhead in among a tangle of wires. I think I dropped the screws at least 20 times. They'd bounce and often go somewhere inaccessible, starting a whole new project to find and retrieve them. Who thinks this is a good idea???
sometimes slotted screws are used on purpose so it is difficult to over torque them,

it's easier to get a lot of torque on a robbie or phillips as opposed to slotted
 

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Seems like using a straight screwdriver is a skill that has been mostly lost. I have never had a problem with these because my dad taught me the technique to keep it centered while twisting. But if you don't do it right you will ruin the screw head and then it becomes a real pain. Why do you need a power driver for a cover plate? I think you would crack the plate very easily.
Now I'm curious. What's the technique your dad taught you?
 

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Far too many years ago the electronics shop I worked in reconed the speakers in a huge cabinet. There were 70-80 phillips head screws holding the back cover in place and the owner made me go back and set every last one of them to exactly the same position. 🤬
 
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