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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, thinking about using a slew of MWBC circuits in the kitchen. GFCI outlets would be awkward for my application and single pole GFCI breakers won't work. Using double pole GFCI breakers would be costly, especially if I want the whole kitchen covered.

Legacy wiring has the kitchen on a dedicated panel inside the kitchen fed with 2P 50A breaker anyway. Proposing putting a 70A "SPA Pack" panel w/2P 50A w/neutral sense GFCI breaker (~$100) in-line with the kitchen panel feed, physically close to (behind) the kitchen panel.

I know this can sometimes compound nuisance tripping problems.

Interesting in hearing field experiences good or bad. How common is this practice?

The fridge will be on a separate circuit back to the SE panel. But I'm hoping to put the dishwasher and garbage disposal on the GFCI protected panel.

Thank you in advance!
 

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Why would you subject the entire kitchen to shutting off with one breaker.
What is the reason you can't/don't want to use gfci receptacles?

Gfci recptacles work on MWBC if properly connected.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I do have a 240V countertop appliance that needs support, and plan to get another. I don't think 240V are required to have GFCI but I'd like to cover them if at all practical.

And I do have a short list of "hidden" agendas and personal tastes I won't go into.

I get the impression that this practice has a small but growing following and I'm interested in field experiences.

Truth is my intention is to use a ground fault current indicator for a while before getting the spa pack, so I should have some data on my installation soon.

Mostly looking for field experiences good, bad, or prohibited.

-Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Leaning toward using 3X 20A two pole GFCI's instead of 1X 50A: fits more like a "glove" than a "mit".

Actually I have a bunch of ground fault "early warning" detectors I cherry picked from an auction load, I'll gather data with that while I troll for 20A two pole GFCI's... looks like my brand can be had new for ~$25 each if I'm willing to wait a month or so between breakers.

I don't think GFCI's are required, but my countertop and cabinets are all stainless. And occasionally I do "don't touch" projects in the kitchen, it's good to have GFCI in case they do get touched or splashed. In any case I can afford to wait while I monkey around with the early warning device. It doesn't take much imagination to see how the NC alarm outputs could be used to hold a contactor closed if I want some protection in the meanwhile.

I better brush up on code for commercial kitchens. It only serves my residence but practically speaking most of the same issues apply. I think I'm all good but I better read it through.

-Jeff
 

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I do have a 240V countertop appliance that needs support, and plan to get another. I don't think 240V are required to have GFCI but I'd like to cover them if at all practical.
It's not required, but whatever floats your boat.





I get the impression that this practice has a small but growing following and I'm interested in field experiences.
Not sure where you are hearing this, but it NOT from the real world.




Leaning toward using 3X 20A two pole GFCI's instead of 1X 50A: fits more like a "glove" than a "mit".
A MUCH better choice. :thumbsup:
 
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