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I'm going to start putting up my top and bottom moldings on my kitchen cabinets. As we all know, kitchen cabinets aren't cheap and I paid a nice amount for good quality cabinets. My question is, since I don't want to mess up these moldings, what amount of teeth on a blade should I use? I'm using my 10in miter saw. I've heard mixed comments about using either the 60 or 80 teeth blade. Anyone have any comments on which I should use. Thanks in advance.
 

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Remodel and New Build GC
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I don't think you're going to have any problem with either blade assuming a quality maker....

I would not run a Harbor Freight.... But HF is good if you have a distressed wood project going.
 

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I think 60 is more than enough. Regular kerf is better vs thin kerf. Thicker blade means less vibration, but this isn't that important with a good saw. I use Forrest from box stores. Cut when the blade is spinning at max and lift off the blade when it is still spinning at max.
 

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I worked in a custom millshop for one summer after HS (50+ years ago) and before college and I guarantee I've forgotten 98% of what they taught me, but switching blades on equipment was a frequent first step before doing any cutting. Owner had a huge selection of blades and a blade sharpening business. So I went looking for a link that might go into some of the details I have forgotten and this one looked good. I only read some of it because a combination blade does most of what I need these days. So, here is more than you may ever need to know about blades, but sometimes it is nice to know.
http://www.rockler.com/how-to/blades-101

Bud
 
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not to argue, but in our cabinet shop, we never lift a miter saw while it is running, we wait until it stops. often, additional tear out occurs on the lift, or worse, cutoff pieces go flying.

agree, a 60 tooth quality blade should be fine. good saw technique is more important than blade tooth count... for example, pull the head down toward the table and notice the direction the teeth would be spinning if it were cutting. most will be cutting in the upward direction or lifting. if you can cut upside down you will get a better cut on the front surface. not all trim lets you cut upside down. in that case you may be better standing it on edge... experiment to get the best cut/least tearout.
 
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