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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a new pool pump that works on 240 so I need to adapt my electric panel because my present pump is 120.

In the picture, you can see the:

1 - information on the pool pump which is a silensorpro.
2 - Stab-Lok 240 V - 15 amp
3 - single Receptacle outlet 20 AMP and 250V, ( I already had this one, so I decided not to buy a 15 AMP -250 V receptacle
4 - diagram of the electrical panel
5 - photo of the actual setup.

My question is the following:

Considering the info on the panel, I have two options.

Option 1 - I install the 240 breaker in circuits 2 and 3.
Option 2 - I install the 240 breaker in circuits 6 and 7.

I think that I should use Option 1 because I only have a White and a Black wire.

Is this right?

Thanks
Denis

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It makes no difference which of the two place you place the double breaker. The results are exactly the same.
Is this because my receptacle has only 2 wires which means that it can go in both places? (Tthe 2-3 position is for 2 wires and the 6-7 position for 3 wires.)
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You have a possible mess on your hands. It would be far easier to get a 120v pump and use what you have.

I can not see how the breakers connect to the phases in the picture. So I will not comment on that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You have a possible mess on your hands. It would be far easier to get a 120v pump and use what you have.

I can not see how the breakers connect to the phases in the picture. So I will not comment on that.
Thank you for your comment but the pump has already been bought and it has one clear advantage from the one I have, it is a very silent one. ;-)
 

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It is only showing a 3 wire connection. The slots work exactly the same giving you 240 volts. You can use 2 or 3 wire at either location.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It is only showing a 3 wire connection. The slots work exactly the same giving you 240 volts. You can use 2 or 3 wire at either location.
I am a bit confuses joed, you say it is only showing a 3 wire connections. Could it be that we are not talking about the same thing?

On the top it does talk about 2 wires and 3 wires.

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You can use a 2 or a 3 wire connection in either of those positions. It just depends if you need a neutral or not. It show a three wire connection but if you don't connect the neutral it is a two wire connection.
Here I made them both into 3 wire connections.

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There's nothing wrong with getting some red electrical tape and wrapping the white wire on both ends to re-mark it red to be a hot. This will work for "hot, hot, ground, no neutral" 240V loads like motors and heaters. It will not work for multi-component loads like ovens (with 120V oven lights) or dryers (with 120V motors and controls).

Need not be red, any legal hot color will suffice, e.g. black tape.

2 - Stab-Lok 240 V - 15 amp
3 - single Receptacle outlet 20 AMP and 250V, ( I already had this one, so I decided not to buy a 15 AMP -250 V receptacle
LOL you can't do that. A 20A receptacle requires a 20A breaker. Change breaker or receptacle.

In fact just get a common duplex 6-15 receptacle, they look like normal sockets and use normal 10 cent cover plates instead of having to hunt down special weird round ones.

Note that the same rules apply to 240V circuits as apply to 120V circuits:

  • 15A loads are approved to be on 20A circuits, that's why the socket has a T-shaped hole.
  • 15A receptacles are allowed on a 20A circuit if there are 2 or more sockets. (any duplex receptacle qualifies).
  • You can get duplex 6-15 and 6-20.

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You can use a 2 or a 3 wire connection in either of those positions. It just depends if you need a neutral or not. It show a three wire connection but if you don't connect the neutral it is a two wire connection.
Here I made them both into 3 wire connections.

View attachment 701330
OK Now I understand. I can use one or another. :)

Last question, I hope ;-) , my wire that links my receptacle to my 120 breaker is a 2 wire + ground wire.

Right now, the BLACK is attach to the breaker. the WHITE is to the neutral bus bar and of course the ground to the ground.

Now that I want to use a 240 breaker, I will connect the BLACK on the left side of the 240 breaker and disconnect the WHITE for the neutral bus bar and connect it to the right side of the 240 breaker, like the picture below.

Light Material property Rectangle Gas Wood


At least this is my understanding.

AM I right?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You wrote: LOL you can't do that. A 20A receptacle requires a 20A breaker.

I don't understand, why. It would receive a smaller charge. How can that be bad?
 

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Now that I want to use a 240 breaker, I will connect the BLACK on the left side of the 240 breaker and disconnect the WHITE for the neutral bus bar and connect it to the right side of the 240 breaker
Yes that is correct. That will give you 240 volts between black and the white. You should also wrap some black tape around both ends of the white wire to indicate it is being used as hot and not a neutral.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes that is correct. That will give you 240 volts between black and the white. You should also wrap some black tape around both ends of the white wire to indicate it is being used as hot and not a neutral.
Excellent. Thank you. It is very much appreciated.

Now, just to be on the safe side, is a 15AMP breaker enough for this pump?

From my understanding it is, but is it?

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You wrote: LOL you can't do that. A 20A receptacle requires a 20A breaker.

I don't understand, why. It would receive a smaller charge. How can that be bad?
The size of the breaker does not limit the current in any way whatsoever. It's not a metering device, it doesn't go into PWM current regulation if you pull more. You can pull 50A through a 15A breaker if you really want to* . We don't want 20A capable appliances to be able to plug into 15A circuits.

"But it's a 15A breaker? If it can't prevent the appliance drawing 50A, why doesn't it just trip?" <--- see, you're hanging everything on the breaker, all safety depends on the breaker working properly. You now have a single point of failure.

We don't like designing systems with single points of failure.



* Just if all things are working properly, for a limited time per its trip curve. Operative word "IF".
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
OK, I want to use 6-7 because it was easier, but I have one last hesitation.

As you see in the picture, there are 3 big wires that comes from my house to the panel in my shed. There are also 3 segments to connect. (I - II and III) is it because positions 2-3 connect segments I and II, and, positions 6-7 connect segments II and III that the 240V is created?

Thanks for all your answers. It helps me better understand.

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Sections I and III are connected under the plastic insulator. They are connected to the black hot wire from the house. The red hot wire from the house connects to the middle segment. Position 2 is connected to the black hot. Position 3 is connected the red hot. This is how you get 240 volts when a double pole breaker is inserted. One pole of the breaker connects to 2 and the other pole connects to 3.
 
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