DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
At an entry to a room, where do you place the floor tile? It is recommended to center the tile across the width of the opening, but where do you start the full tile.

There are two options.

Option 1:
Start right at the door, so when you close the door, the tile is right at the edge. This will require to cut tiles along the wall to the left of the door (as viewed from the photo).

Option 2:
Start at the wall depth. This will not require any cuts to the tile along the wall to the left (except for the wall being not squared).

A transition strip can be put in between the room and the hallway so I would think either option would work. I just don't know if there are any disadvantages to doing options 2 since the transition strip my be bigger than normal.

I haven't decided if I will lay tile (a different tile than the room), or lay carpet in the area outside the doorway.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
An update:

I meant to say that I haven't decided if I will lay tile (a different tile) or lay wood flooring in the area outside the room (the hallway). I am removing the carpet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
452 Posts
Center of the doorway.. But PLEASE!, cut the door jam so the tile slides under! I hate it when people tile up to the jamb and try and notch around the trim! Good luck !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Center of the doorway.. But PLEASE!, cut the door jam so the tile slides under! I hate it when people tile up to the jamb and try and notch around the trim! Good luck !
So you would recommend moving option 1 slightly lower, and center it with the door itself. Thus halve the door will have tile under it, the other half will not.

I attached some photos of what I think you were recommending. This will require cutting all the tiles to the left.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
452 Posts
Yes, but just so you know.. It is rare to start tile at a wall or door for that matter... Always better to start from the center and work your way out.
 

·
Renovations contractor
Joined
·
324 Posts
Also remember to allow space for your flooring transition strip / riser / reducer / t-mold / whatever-you-may-call-it-depending-on-profile :whistling2:

ie. if it is a t-mold (going from same height hardwood to tile) then you need around 1/2" gap for the moulding to sit.
 

·
Renovations contractor
Joined
·
324 Posts
Yes, but just so you know.. It is rare to start tile at a wall or door for that matter... Always better to start from the center and work your way out.
I would recommend doing a dry lay of the tile (ie. just sit them in place, nothing actually set) before you finalize the layout ... either that or at least draw out a detailed floor layout. The idea of this is to avoid any narrow cuts in obvious places such as the doorway or in front of a shower, etc.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
25,770 Posts
I like the center of the door--not center of the jamb---with the door closed you should not see the flooring from the adjacent room---

Every one does the layout differently---if a full tile will work at the door way and leave you with a good sized cut on the opposite wall--I will do it.

A word of caution--if the room is large--often the door tile might end up in a different spot than you planned due to the grout lines --

I always draw a grid on the floor ---makes the layout easier to work from and allows you to cut a lot of tile before mixing the thinset.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, but just so you know.. It is rare to start tile at a wall or door for that matter... Always better to start from the center and work your way out.
I just moved it for the photo.

I attached photos of two layouts I can do.

1) Center two tiles in the doorway
This leaves about a 50% tile to the right against the wall

2) Center one tile in the doorway
This leaves about a 98% to 100% tile to the right.
 

Attachments

·
Renovations contractor
Joined
·
324 Posts
Throwing this out there not intentionally to confuse ... but you could go for something other than a chequerboard layout (regular grid pattern). I will not suggest diagonal as far more complex for a newbie but brick lay is another option (ie. each row offset by half tile from the previous ... like the bricks on a wall). Just another thought if you find the grid pattern ends up with skinny cuts where you would rather not have them.

Brick lay is also good if you need to buy yourself some flexibility due to walls being squint, etc as you can vary alternate rows by a fraction without it being noticeable to the naked eye ... other than anyone sat on the toilet with too much time to kill :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the help.

I aligned the tiles in relation to the right wall, so visually it should look in alignment from someone viewing it from the doorway. I think it looks ok. There is 6.5 inches to the right wall (so just over half a tile)

There are two choices for the forward/back position of the tiles.
1) Align it so the tiles do not show when the door is closed.
This requires moving the tiles back 0.5 inches.

2) Align it as in the photo, which shows half an inch of tile when the door is closed. There is 3.5 inches left to the back wall in the photo.

After seeing the photos, any advise. Thanks.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,616 Posts
you will need a transition strip between the tile and carpet. this strip should be covered when the door is closed. but, since you have the carpet cut back, you will need a wider transition strip. this could be many different materials, your call. or just run the tile up to the carpet, allowing for a transition = not "proper" but would look ok if your not picky.

as far as centering the tiles in the doorway. that is really up to you.
 

·
Renovations contractor
Joined
·
324 Posts
Depending where you are located, you may be able to get a maple or oak transition that is about 3.5" wide ... We use this a lot for such issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
you will need a transition strip between the tile and carpet. this strip should be covered when the door is closed. but, since you have the carpet cut back, you will need a wider transition strip. this could be many different materials, your call. or just run the tile up to the carpet, allowing for a transition = not "proper" but would look ok if your not picky.

as far as centering the tiles in the doorway. that is really up to you.
The carpet in the photo is coming out. I will replace it with another type of tile, or a wooden floor.

I just wanted to check if I should move the tiles back 1/2 inch so the tile does not show when the door is closed.
 

·
Renovations contractor
Joined
·
324 Posts
In short, if you can do the install such that you only see tile and transition strip from the bathroom (with door closed) and vice versa from the other room then that generally looks best.
 

·
Renovations contractor
Joined
·
324 Posts
FYI: when doing flooring installs I often find the door transition is the biggest bone of contention ... The actual floor can look amazing but it the transition is at all funky that can become a big deal for the home owner ... So we seem to spend a disproportionate amount of time getting that one element exactly to their liking. In the end it is all about the details as they say.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
In short, if you can do the install such that you only see tile and transition strip from the bathroom (with door closed) and vice versa from the other room then that generally looks best.
OK, this makes sense now. I guess that is why they call it a transition strip :)

I checked online and saw an example of a transition strip if using tile to tile.

The photo with the light brown transition is a nice transition strip, though the border work looks like a lot of work. The tile in the room is behind the door, so when the door is closed, only the transition strip is shown.

The photo with the
brown and white tile shows a smaller transition strip (and creative), and when the door is shut, only the transition strip shows.

Thanks for the help. Much appreciated.
 

Attachments

·
Renovations contractor
Joined
·
324 Posts
Depending on the 2 adjoining flooring surfaces (and especially when one is a bathroom & tile) your transition may be straight across from height A to height A ... that's the simplest. However often you need a reducer going one way or the other ie. if there is a change in height. Often this happens if for example there is radiant heat in the bathroom or extra plywood added to beef up the subfloor when installing tile or if a self leveller had to be poured to level off wonky floors. Lots of reasons but you get the idea.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top