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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there

I want to connect a water booster pump to my water line. My house' main pipe is 1/2 inch. I realized that I can cut the pipe and connect it to another one, using a 'No hub coupling', but after searching the net, I couldn't find anything smaller that 1 1/2 inch. Anyone have any idea where to find 1/2 inch no hub coupling or any other method than I can do it myself? :vs_karate:

Thanks
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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What is the pipe material.? No hub coupling refers to drain lines, not water supply lines.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's metal pipe and probably I want to connect it to a PVC pipe.
I thought no hub coupling can be used for water line as well. So, instead of calling a plumber to thread the pipe, is there any way I can connect a pump to the water line?
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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Metal pipe is not very descriptive. Is it copper pipe with soldered joints or galvanized iron with threaded joints. Maybe a picture and a sketch of what you are trying to do would help find you an answer. Make and model # of the pump?
 

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Find a piece of rubber hose that fits tight over both pipes and use hose clamps to hold it on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for your replies

Pipe material is galvanized iron and it goes under the ground through a little garden and then connect to the building. To access the pipe, I need to dig the soil, cut it and then connect the water pump. As I don't have a threader and it seems to be expensive, I am looking for an easy and cost saving way to do so.

I saw your suggestions for shark coupling and dresser coupling. I'm not really familiar with these type of joints, but I hope it would help me.

Thanks again
 

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Thanks for your replies

Pipe material is galvanized iron and it goes under the ground through a little garden and then connect to the building. To access the pipe, I need to dig the soil, cut it and then connect the water pump. As I don't have a threader and it seems to be expensive, I am looking for an easy and cost saving way to do so.

I saw your suggestions for shark coupling and dresser coupling. I'm not really familiar with these type of joints, but I hope it would help me.


Thanks again
The only way you can go the sharkbite route is if you can unthread the pipe at a joint and install a threaded sharkbite as attached in the picture. Even though brass holds up great when going to galvanized alot of local codes require that you install a dielectric union when changing from galvanized to copper and inorder to do so you would have to sweat copper. A torch, some flux and solder goes along way. Good luck!
 

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Thanks for your replies

Pipe material is galvanized iron and it goes under the ground through a little garden and then connect to the building. To access the pipe, I need to dig the soil, cut it and then connect the water pump. As I don't have a threader and it seems to be expensive, I am looking for an easy and cost saving way to do so.

I saw your suggestions for shark coupling and dresser coupling. I'm not really familiar with these type of joints, but I hope it would help me.


Thanks again
The only way you can go the sharkbite route is if you can unthread the pipe at a joint and install a threaded sharkbite as attached in the picture. Even though brass holds up great when going to galvanized alot of local codes require that you install a dielectric union when changing from galvanized to copper and inorder to do so you would have to sweat copper. A torch, some flux and solder goes along way. Good luck!
Here is the attachment
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks everyone

Sharkbites are applicable only for copper, CPVC and pex pipes. Galvanized Compression Couplings seems to be a solution of this problem, but I am not exactly sure whether it can use for unthreaded galvanized pipes in long term or not. Reviews are also very different. Some experts suggest it only for an emergency repair, but some others believe it can be use with no worries. Anyone has experience using these dressing couplings before?
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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Thanks everyone

Sharkbites are applicable only for copper, CPVC and pex pipes. Galvanized Compression Couplings seems to be a solution of this problem, but I am not exactly sure whether it can use for unthreaded galvanized pipes in long term or not. Reviews are also very different. Some experts suggest it only for an emergency repair, but some others believe it can be use with no worries. Anyone has experience using these dressing couplings before?
Long term you should plan on replacing all of the galvy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for your reply

Is your pipes galvanized iron?

Could you please provide me a link or a picture of the coupling you used at your property?
 
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