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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a foreclosed house up for auction and now that i've closed, noticed most of the pvc pipes in the basement have been broken. Where should I begin?
 

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Take some pictures of the existing work. Then start cutting out the damaged pipes. Replace them with the the same size pipe and fittings. Hopefully the cracks didn't go up through the floor line. Consider doing a smoke test now or after you think you're done. The harmless smoke will leak out the cracks if any are left.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, There is nothiing to take pictures of, it's all destroyed, probably done by whoever got foreclosed on. We are hoping that the interior pipes in the walls aren't broken too. It is or was PVC. My husband is headed to Lowes to check out the pex line. Had never heard of the smoke test, interesting.
 

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I assumes the pipes were still somewhat intact. A smoke test won't work with pipe missing.
If you can't figure out how to get from point A to point B, let us know. Hope no broken pipe got down the drain lines. That could lead to backups in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
We did a quick walk through and fell in love with it. We are both old house lovers and all the woodwork and hardware were intact with 12 foot ceilings, big rooms etc. It was going up for auction with a starting bid of 25K and we did a presale auction bid of 25,900, and they accepted it. I'm still in NY trying to sell my house and my Husband is in Tennessee trying to get water in the house. He is not a happy camper in 95 degrees with no water and he's been there 5 days. I did find him a hotel last night. Will keep you posted.
 

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Checking for leaks

I'm not a professional plumber, but I have heard you can use compressed air to check the integrity of the pipes. Once repairs are made, charge it and see if the pressure holds. Any leaks will likely make a whistle. Good luck with your project.
 

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I think you're best off to hire a professional home inspector. Also someone to inspect the drain lines with a camera. Perhaps even a structural engineer. Have everything checked out. It will be well worth the investment.
 
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