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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was recently on a tour through Canada and quickly found out, it is hard to get freshly brewed, Ice Tea in Canada. The Ice Tea I got was just sweet tea from a can. I ask my tour guide about what the story was behind the absents of freshly brewed ice tea in Canada? He said, he knows no one that can drew tea good enough, that anyone would want to drink it. That just doesn't sound right. So I am asking our Canadian members, what is the story behind Canadian dislike about Ice Tea?
 

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Naildriver
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Go to New Jersey and ask for Sweet Tea. They'll laugh you out of the restaurant. Not able to find it in Denver area, either. Here in the South, no one would think of having a meal without Sweet Tea.
 

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When I traveled Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi and parts of Alabama both were available. If you didn't ask for sweet you got unsweetened tea. I was raised on sweet tea but got accustomed to unsweetened and like that now also. Makes no difference to me what they put on the table. Don't remember what I had the couple times I went to Canada on a job.
 
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I bought a fantastic 3 quart pitcher on Amazon, the top snaps on easily, compared to my 2 quart Tupperware one, ( it’s great) and everyday we drink the 3 quarts of Ice tea…

I make it every morning with 3 Lipton tea bags…I sweeten mine with one sweet n’ low…and now the head guy is using a half bag of sweet n low to sweeten his tea.
 

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Same thing I do except 4 bags to one gallon water. No sweeter of any kind or as my mother made it, heat to boiling, put, gad I don't know, enough sugar in a pitcher to almost make a syrup and pour the boiling tea over that, stir until dissolved.
 
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Same thing I do except 4 bags to one gallon water. No sweeter of any kind or as my mother made it, heat to boiling, put, gad I don't know, enough sugar in a pitcher to almost make a syrup and pour the boiling tea over that, stir until dissolved.
When you say 4 bags do you mean the small cup sized bags? Or something bigger?

I use bulk loose tea and brew mine in the coffee maker.
 

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When you say 4 bags do you mean the small cup sized bags? Or something bigger?

I use bulk loose tea and brew mine in the coffee maker.
I have cup size tea bags and hmm, probably used 6 or 8 of those. My mother used loose tea and strained it into a pitcher. I've also put the bags in a coffee maker and did alright.
 

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My father drank unsweetened tea when working on his farm, so I grew up carrying the jug of tea to the fields where he was on his tractor, then sharing it with him. I still like unsweetened tea. I can drink sweet tea, but I prefer unsweetened. In our area of western NY the stores tend to carry unsweetened tea and sweet tea, never any extra sweet tea. In FL I frequently see sweet tea and extra sweet tea, no unsweetened tea.
 
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While on the subject of tea, has anybody besides me make tea eggs.

You can also do these with food coloring.

 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I guess I mislabeled this thread. Should have been "Where is the CANADIAN tea?" I know we have a large number of Canadian members, what is the story about why Canada is down on tea?
As for my taste in tea, I like it unsweetened and ad a pink packet (Sweet'N Low), with a lot of ice, just before I drink it. I make a gallon at a time. I put about 1/3 of a gallon, of ((hot)) tap-water in a gallon container, then throw in a Lipton (gallon) size tea bag. I let it steep for at least a hour, then fill the container with cold tap-water. The tea bag normally floats to the surface, when the cold tap-water is added, so it can be easily removed. The floating thing, may depend on your water quality.
It sounds like most of us in the states, like our tea. So what’s with the Canadians?
 

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One more comment. Have you ever made tea that just didn't look strong enough? Put a pinch of baking soda in the hot water/tea bags. The neutral soda will draw out the astringent remaing tea out of the bags.
 

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It's not just as big of a cultural thing. Maybe it is in some parts of the country, either for the locals or a heavy US tourism clientele, I don't know. I would think from a retailer's point of view, it's much like coffee; if you don't have enough demand for brewed tea, you probably end up throwing a bunch out after a certain period of time.

I know on bike trips into the States, I learned to ask for sweet tea for what we call 'iced tea'; otherwise I get, well, cold tea, and drinking cold tea is about as enjoyable as drinking cold coffee.

Different countries and regions, different tastes. I imagine if I went to Colorado and asked for poutine or beer that didn't taste like water I'd be disappointed. :)
 

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Go to New Jersey and ask for Sweet Tea. They'll laugh you out of the restaurant. Not able to find it in Denver area, either. Here in the South, no one would think of having a meal without Sweet Tea.
My friend who moved here from the NE was amazed he could not get a cup of hot tea anywhere. He said they could get hot tea at McDonalds up there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
It's not just as big of a cultural thing. Maybe it is in some parts of the country, either for the locals or a heavy US tourism clientele, I don't know. I would think from a retailer's point of view, it's much like coffee; if you don't have enough demand for brewed tea, you probably end up throwing a bunch out after a certain period of time.

I know on bike trips into the States, I learned to ask for sweet tea for what we call 'iced tea'; otherwise I get, well, cold tea, and drinking cold tea is about as enjoyable as drinking cold coffee.

Different countries and regions, different tastes. I imagine if I went to Colorado and asked for poutine or beer that didn't taste like water I'd be disappointed. :)
But why don't Canadians order and like ice tea. It must be a cultural thing, or they just don't like ICE. You can't confuse tea with coffee. There is plenty of coffee to go around. If you have enough Baileys in your cold (ice) coffee, it tested good also.
 

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But why don't Canadians order and like ice tea. It must be a cultural thing, or they just don't like ICE. You can't confuse tea with coffee. There is plenty of coffee to go around. If you have enough Baileys in your cold (ice) coffee, it tested good also.
I'm not sure that's accurate. I don't eat out a lot but myself and family will often order iced tea (with the exception of breakfast or, you know, booze), and I frequently see other patrons doing so. Admittedly, it probably is not fresh-brewed - at least they don't serve it in the can or bottle they got it in - that's really declasse.

I don't think a 'block' observation is anymore relevant to Canada than it is in relation to the US. There are no doubt regional preferences, tastes and habits in both countries. You can't get grits up here either. I understand pop/soft drinks are a popular breakfast beverage in some parts of the States.
 

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When I traveled for work, I had to visit sites in the south. I prefer drinking Iced Tea over soda and other things so on my first trip I discovered Sweat Tea.

At my first swallow, I could feel my teeth groan and start to decay with every sip. I drank about half the glass before my lips refused to allow more in.

I learned to ask for UNSWEETENED ICED TEA whenever I traveled in the south.

Up there in the North or in my case South West, it is easy to find brewed Iced Tea. Most of the time it is unsweetened, or at least the server asks which type you want.
 

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Admittedly, it probably is not fresh-brewed - at least they don't serve it in the can or bottle they got it in - that's really declasse.
Every canned or bottled tea I've ever had, I took one drink and spit it out. I haven't found one that's drinkable yet. Only strong (for my homemade, I use 1-1/2 times the 'normal' number of teabags), fresh brewed, unsweetened tea for me. Around here, most restaurants and fast food places have both. A few have one or the other, and a few don't have either fresh brewed.
 
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