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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was close to a decision about what type of replacement WH to get, when I was told no new WH's come with cords, that they're all "hard-wired" now. Is that something that the plumber does? Is that done at the point of the existing receptacle?
 

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I was close to a decision about what type of replacement WH to get, when I was told no new WH's come with cords, that they're all "hard-wired" now. Is that something that the plumber does? Is that done at the point of the existing receptacle?
I've never seen a whole house(30 -50 gallon) electric water heater that plugged in. Plumbing companies usually have an electrician they work with to install the electric aspects of a job.
 

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I was close to a decision about what type of replacement WH to get, when I was told no new WH's come with cords, that they're all "hard-wired" now. Is that something that the plumber does? Is that done at the point of the existing receptacle?
Ayuh,.... Water heaters have usually been hard wired, like Forever,....

Donno what codes are, 'n Donno why yer's was wired with a plug whip, 'n receptacle,...

The Plumbers I know can do some electrical, 'n the Electricians I know can do alittle plumbin',...

Wherever yer buyin' the water heater oughta be able to point ya in the right direction, locally speakin',...
 

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Plumbers should be able to wire it into an existing junction box/disconnect switch supplied for the heater. It would be considered part of the installation not electrical.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My 27-gallon WH was plugged in at least 18 years ago, maybe longer, and just quit last week. It's the third WH that's been in this house in 39 years! I hope they still make them like that. Thanks for the replies, now that I'm over the initial shock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Can't imagine why they did away with power cords in the first place. Seems to me if something went haywire, one could just unplug it real quick unless....

The junction box/disconnect switch of which you speak, is that going where the electric outlet is now? Maybe the disconnect switch replaces the unplugging?
 

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Being totally clueless on the subject myself.... is that wise from a safety stand point???
It was done that way for people to plug them into a generator when power goes out. Only issue is that you would have one generator for the water heater and another for the other stuff in the house, if you did not get one large enough.
 

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Can't imagine why they did away with power cords in the first place.
Ayuh,.... "They" didn't,.... There never were water heaters with power cords,....

Somebody Put a power cord on the heater installed at yer house,...

It's reasonably simple operation to put the cord on the heater, much like hard wirin' it,...
Actually, Just like hard wirin' it,...
 

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The house I used to live in, in Colorado, did have a plug-in electric water heater. They do exist. Whether it is code compliant, that's another question.
 

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Unless I missed it on this code compliant site, of about a half dozen replies I've not seen one single reply that states what their code is.

Ramble on, it's my early morning entertainment.:biggrin2:
 

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The house I used to live in, in Colorado, did have a plug-in electric water heater. They do exist. Whether it is code compliant, that's another question.
It is Code Compliant as long as there is easy access to turning off the power first.

Colorado you have the chance of a power outage. Being able to plug the water heater into a genset helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
time for a picture

The picture is looking down from atop WH (tabletop) which is 36" tall. Maybe this round thing is a junction box? That's why I'd like to know if whatever the plumber does electric-wise happens at the outlet which is pictured.

The WH is on its own circuit, all by itself, and I turned it off (flipped the switch down) which I assume is "easy access to turning off the power...." Although I am still getting water through the spigots, cold as it may be, so what is driving the cold water out of the faucets? Is it an electric force making it flow? Gravity? I just thought of that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
a better picture

Howz this? The cord from the round thing to the heater is about 4 inches; it's hard to see the cord, but it starts at the blue nipple coming off the blue round thing and runs to the the little white nub against the heater.

In the second picture, the line to the left of the round thing (that has dust hanging off of it) is a hard pipe that goes to the top of the tank, where all the plumbing and electrical connections reside.

Pipe head pressure = al2x oe9e naksusjl.

Does pipe head pressure rely on electricity?

If a plumber comes out and cuts the pipes and drains everything and turns off all that can be turned off and HAULS IT AWAY, and I turn on the cold water at the kitchen sink after he leaves, will I have my regular flow of cold water? Is the cold water flow independent of the hot water heater?
 
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