DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
590 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I might not have the wording correct, but talking about when you layer tiles row by row, but for rectangular tiles (e.g. 2ft by 1ft) are staggered between rows like the 3rd icon with an X in the photo. I only recently noticed this while buying tile.

I am just wondering are there really cases where the look of the tile design/pattern doesn't work with this kind of layout whereas it would work fine for unstaggered row layout or the diagonal row layout depicted in the other two icons? Or is it more a matter of personal preference? Would be interesting to see extreme cases where it would look odd.

Rectangle Font Pattern Electric blue Linens


Similarly are there cases where the other 2 layout options (not X'd) would look weird instead?

Regarding this tile box in question, the design is this one:




Strangely, the preview of that tile design shows a staggered layout, opposite of the recommendation of the box packaging.
 

·
Naildriver
Joined
·
19,951 Posts
Here's what a feeble attempt at the close joints looks like. The guy even cut tiles mid run to try to match the package. We had to tear it all out, cbu and all, install a 3/4" advantech subfloor on it, new cbu and tile.

Brown Tile flooring Wood Rectangle Beige
 

·
Contractor/Engineer
Joined
·
2,656 Posts
Horrid! You either line them up or your seriously stagger them! Not, cut them so they are kinda close.
 
  • Like
Reactions: chandler48

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,300 Posts
What the tile pictograms are trying to show does not deal with the "look" of the tile, it deals with "lippage", which is one tile's edge being higher than the tile beside it. Nothing is perfectly flat, and lippage is more pronounced with certain patterns on tiles that are not very flat.

I am no expert, but a 50% overlap is commonly not recommended on longer tile because lippage will be exaggerated. That is what the third pictogram is trying to show.

The second pictogram is probably not very useful because it does not define a value for the maximum recommended overlap, but I think up to 1/3 overlap is commonly considered acceptable. Possibly they are trying to show that small amounts of overlap are preferred.
 

·
Naildriver
Joined
·
19,951 Posts
I located some excellent lippage prevention devices last week. Will have to see if my old helper can make good use of them. One good thing about them is they are reusable, since the T tip is stainless steel. I'll report back if they work well or not. They are made for thin grout lines, which is what we most tried to achieve.

Gas Transparency Tool Wood Electric blue
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,595 Posts
SPS nailed it - the box does a horrible job explaining the point. It's funny they don't show the most popular layout of all -- 1/3 offset. You can use whatever pattern you desire. You might or might not notice the lippage. You can always use a good tile leveling system if lippage is a concern. It probably won't fix heavily warped tiles, but that is something you can check in the store if you're buying from Home Depot or Lowes. If you've got heavily warped tiles you're going to have a problem no matter what pattern you use.

 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top