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When installing drywall, does the ceiling drywall go up first to the edge of the top plate 2x4 of the room, then the wall drywall will be pushed up against the ceiling's? Or do you put the wall drywall up first pushing against the ceiling joists, then the ceiling drywall pushing against the wall drywall?
 

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In my house, having to muscle the ceiling sheets up alone, I'd sometimes do the walls first, which allowed me to prop one side of the ceiling sheet on the top wall piece as I was screwing it in.

But I was young and indestructible then. If I did it today I'd rent one of those lifts. The advice to do the ceiling first makes sense to me.
 

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Ceiling first always!
The walls sheets help keep the ceiling from sagging causing cracks.
Always run the top sheet on the wall first, the bottom sheet should have about a 1/2" gap from the floor, reasons being a floor is almost never flat, and it prevent wicking from the bottom of the wall.
 

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Rent or buy a drywall lift!
It makes hanging on a ceiling a one man job.
 

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I have a friend who was a pro hanger back when he was young [it's rare to see hangers over the age of 40] He has hung complete houses by himself although he preferred to have help. He showed me how to take a 2x and build a T for a prop - it works well. He'd also set nails along the perimeter first so once up all he had to do was knock them in .... and then go back and finish securing the sheet with screws or nails.
 

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Regarding the nails vs. screws, I still don't get it and I probably never will. Pros must know something I don't because I see a lot of drywall hung this way. (Then again, I see a lot of building mistakes propagated for no other reason than "that's how I've seen it done.") IMO it's easier to screw in a screw than hammer in a nail. You can preinsert screws just like you do a nail (and I often do). Screws leave no big hammer marks to be filled in, and you have no hammer blows to weaken the drywall. If you make a mistake and have to take out a piece for some reason, screws are easier and less damaging to get out. It's all screws for me.

Anyway, ceilings are supposed to be installed first, for the basic reason that the wall drywall will help support it. But I think this is overstated. Most of the ceiling has no support, and we can't allow ceilings to sag anywhere, not just at edges. So a nailing schedule has to be used to fully support ceiling drywall anyway. Also, if you're not pressing the wall drywall firmly up into the ceiling drywall, you're not getting support anyway, and a lot of people don't. Also, that top plate isn't too big so taking up 1/2" of it for the ceiling drywall cuts into your room. Not a big deal, but also as some people mentioned if working alone you can use the wall drywall to support the ceiling drywall while installing (you have to get the wall drywall hung at just the right spot for this, which isn't easy either.)

Bottom line, one of them has to go first, so it might as well be the ceiling. But nothing's going to fall apart if you have a reason to do it the other way.
 

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Regarding the nails vs. screws, I still don't get it and I probably never will. Pros must know something I don't because I see a lot of drywall hung this way. (Then again, I see a lot of building mistakes propagated for no other reason than "that's how I've seen it done.") IMO it's easier to screw in a screw than hammer in a nail. You can preinsert screws just like you do a nail (and I often do). Screws leave no big hammer marks to be filled in, and you have no hammer blows to weaken the drywall.
While you are propping the drywall in place it's easier to smack those nails in with a hammer while you hold the drywall in place with your other hand. The mud/tape over those nails almost eliminates any nail pops. I agree screws are best for the rest.
 

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When I am working alone, I screw a 2x4 to the wall a little over the wallboard thickness from the ceiling. Then I can put the end of a ceiling sheet in the slot, push the other end up, and put a tee made from 2-2x4s under the other end. The walls are done after the ceiling.
 
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When I am working alone, I screw a 2x4 to the wall a little over the wallboard thickness from the ceiling. Then I can put the end of a ceiling sheet in the slot, push the other end up, and put a tee made from 2-2x4s under the other end. The walls are done after the ceiling.
So this technique is basically an installation tactic as opposed to having the walls support the ceiling (which as I mentioned above seems fine to me.)
 

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The RIGHT way is ceiling first. As to nails or screws, the old was was all blued nails. Then it went to blued Nails to hold things in place, then screws for the rest. Now it is all screws. Screws have lalrger head and better holding power.
 

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On a related note, I'm considering putting drywall on the ceiling in my garage. The joists are on 24 inch centers. Will the drywall sag? Do I need to install additional support (cross braces, between the joists, for example)?
 

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Rent or buy a drywall lift!
It makes hanging on a ceiling a one man job.
You can attach a 2x4 to the studs (temporarily)about 5/8" below ceiling joists for use as a ledger. Slide the leading edge onto the ledger and use a prop(s) to hold up the other end. Can do the same in the middle if the ceiling; don't snug the temporary ledger to the first sheet so the following sheet will be able to slip in, and the screws in the 2x4 will provide a good space between sheets.
 

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On a related note, I'm considering putting drywall on the ceiling in my garage. The joists are on 24 inch centers. Will the drywall sag? Do I need to install additional support (cross braces, between the joists, for example)?
Drywall is allowed on 24" framing on a ceiling with 1/2" drywall, as long as
  • screws are not farther apart than 12" (correct type of screws obviously)
  • the boards go perpendicular to the framing
  • you're not applying textured coating to it
 

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Drywall is allowed on 24" framing on a ceiling with 1/2" drywall, as long as
  • screws are not farther apart than 12" (correct type of screws obviously)
  • the boards go perpendicular to the framing
  • you're not applying textured coating to it
Thank you. Taking the next step to air condition the garage so the I can use my work area on hot 96 degree Houston nights. I'll be blowing/rolling insulation on top of the drywall.
 

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On a related note, I'm considering putting drywall on the ceiling in my garage. The joists are on 24 inch centers. Will the drywall sag? Do I need to install additional support (cross braces, between the joists, for example)?
Most ceiling are done with 5/8 , but guess 1/2 is rated for 24" too.
 

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A garage sees more humidity than your typical HVAC controlled interior does. I'd be leery of 1/2" sagging yrs down the road. I'd either use 5/8" drywall or add nailers between the ceiling joists so there are more places to screw the drywall to.
 
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