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Discussion Starter #1
I know this is a very general question but I'm looking for anyone's opinion. I'm about to start a big project with upgrading my kitchen and bathroom's floors/counters and while I've done a lot of research I'd like to get some real peoples opinions on this. I'm really looking to sell the home once I've completed so I'd like some floor tile patterns / types which a lot of people will like when they come in. I know much of this is subjective but I'd like any opinions and information you'd like to share with me. I'll keep an open mind and look into what info you guys suggest. Thanks!
 

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Too Short? Cut it Again!
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Floor/counter tile of what type? Vinyl, ceramic, stone. We need a few more clues and what the kitchen and adjoining rooms look like now I think. And is this kitchen space bigger or about the same size of a breadbox? Can you post some pics.

In general, for countertops, stone is the current in thing. But, I can talk my clients into glass or glass terrazo with very little convincing and they get green credits. Some really like the look of concrete countertops with molded in sinks and things.

Got any money honey? All these run in about the same range for careful measuring, fabrication and installation. Solid glass might be a tad higher since not a lot of people have caught on to the material as home countertops so there just are not so many people that can install it.

I guess the next tier down would be like quartz composite countertops, the shells companies put over those existing to look like faux granite, the solids like coian thereunder, high end formica type stuff and finally the box store looking laminate crap.

As for flooring? My clients seem tired of the smaller square kitchen tile floors and many want hardward, bamboo or cork. Stone is still popular. I don't see the interest in slate I once did though. Larger ceramic squares with earth or terra cotta tones work and especially if there needs to be a nice transition to outdoor patio areas with the same. And area rugs in kitchens seem to be back which I do not fully understand but like.

It kind of depends on what you have to work with here and how much you can spend. You will, even in this depressed market, get all the money you sink into a kitchen to improve it right back out from sale of the house.

Bathrooms can go either way. Don't try to make silk purses out of sows ears with them though. Clean all the fixtures, polish the brass, paint cabinets and update door pulls and other hardware. You will be surprised at how large you make the tiniest of of bathrooms (or kitchens) look laying the tile at an angle rather than square to the wall. And use 12x12s or something.

Or go really small with antique oyster tiles or something but with a pattern that runs at an angle and not square.
 

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Stuck in the 70's
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Like you said, this is very subjective.
Without pictures I doubt if you will get any constructive advice.

One thing I will add is to respect the home.
For instance, our house was built in the 70's. It looks like it was built in the 70's, and no matter what we do it will always look like it was built in the 70's. While I would love an old Victorian bathroom with the octagon tile and claw foot tub, it would look absurd in our home.
I would advise to keep in mind the style of the house and don't try to make it look like something it's not.
 

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Too Short? Cut it Again!
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Blondesense;662728 For instance said:
This is one of the most insightful comments ever posted on this site.

Blondsense, if you needed help I would take you on pro bono as a client. You summed up my feelings so completely about frustrations working with clients at times. Nine more years and your home will reach antique status. And, one assumes, become part of an era.

Given my clients and their homes I get it in reverse though, especially with new owners of the oldies but goodies that had no respect for what they were buying in the first place. Twits walk into an 1870s home and think it will work just great with black glass walls, a new home theater in the damp basement, etc, etc.

My usual answer, because I know it is immediately true? It will not fit. And I mean it physically. "Well when I lived in LA/SF/Seattle we never heard things like this!" NYers don't mess with us here so much. I do miss NYC at times but hope California falls into the ocean soon. Florida can go the day after.

So hang in there. Homes antique and part of an era usually hold value well and move quickly off the market. Idjuts I have encountered that thought they wanted one usually bail quickly unless the property is inherited.

Whatever the era and even if not yet antique, a house should have character and sing to the spirit and care of its inhabitants.

So as Blondsense suggests. Be true to your house, the people in it and design around those things? I suspect you might be potentially if not completely content at times.
 
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