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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What type of bottom bracket and tie down for the top do I need for this post? It holds up a carport. If you know the simpson part number or have a link, that would be very helpful.

Thank you





 

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Malcolm or joecaption - this post is very much like the first post I had here. I'm learning. What is holding the large horizontal beam at the top? I see metal brackets but not sure what they're screwed onto? Thanks.

Also, in the third photo, does the strength of the metal connecting the two pieces of wood decrease when twisted like that?
 

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There's 2 routes you can take with this. The best one is getting a C bracket which you will put where you want the post to go, screw it in to the concrete with a couple of tapcons. Bring your post over it and then use some self tapping metal screws and screw the post into the bracket.

The other thing you can do which is probably easier but less attractive is getting some 2" or 4" L clips and screwing those to the post and anchoring them into the concrete. pretty easy job if you have a hammer drill.

For the top part of the post you can use the 2" or 4" L brackets on either side just like at the bottom.
 

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That's a good one to use if there was a real footing under the post.
Right now he would be inserting a Red Head into the seam between the curb and the slab.
Not much holding power doing it there.
 

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That's a good one to use if there was a real footing under the post.
Right now he would be inserting a Red Head into the seam between the curb and the slab.
Not much holding power doing it there.
This may be too much theory, but how do you think that seam came to be there, and why put the post on the seam? Was the whole post done incorrectly?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That's a good one to use if there was a real footing under the post.
Right now he would be inserting a Red Head into the seam between the curb and the slab.
Not much holding power doing it there.
If you look at the picture, you can see the post is at an angle. It isn't plumb. Most of the posts aren't even touching the ground or they have shims under them. That is why I need to do the fix.
 

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If you want a permanent fix, you need to build a proper footer under each post, then you can anchor the post to the footer using a Simpson or equivalent post standoff bracket. The bracket gets connected to the footing using a J bolt if you put the J bolt in during the placement of the footing, or you can use wedge bolts, redheads, or epoxy anchors if you allow the footer to cure first.

If you don't want to put in a footer, then you have to anchor to the slab, which may be only a few inches thick. In that case, you can use tapcons or similar, but you will not get the support your really need for the post. As for hurricane straps that were used, no they are not the right connector, but if you are not going to put in footers for the posts, you may want to consider leaving the hurricane straps in place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What type of wood should I use for the posts? I've read pressure treated wood doesn't paint well. I'm planning on using the simpson anchors that I posted above. Another option would be to use pressure treated 4x4 posts with pvs wraps.
 

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As to the post. Use a pressure treated post. After (or before) you put it up let it dry for a couple of months and you can paint it. Most PT lumber comes from the yard dead wet and won't take paint well. Let it dry out and it can be painted with exterior latex/acrylic paint. Don't use oil base paint because it will peal off after a little while. Alternatively, you can use a solid color exterior deck stain. I've painted miles of PT board and post fence that way and the paint does fine after the PT dries out.
 
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