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Ohming
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28 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am flashing the side wall of a dormer addition. The roof is 12 / 12 pitch and has Elk Prestiqe 50+ yr asphalt shingles installed a few years ago.

The supply house that sold me the shingles a few years ago, sold me 4"x4"x14" step flashing for the side wall. I forgot to ask him install tips. I am lacing the flashing in every second row and leaving about 4" exposed, every row was too much -- it started jamming up.

Is this correct, it "feels " right.
 

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Residential Roofer
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803 Posts
i since found this site, I think it shows the application. http://www.flash.org/resources/files/HGCC_Fact23.pdf
LMAO, I reckon FEMA paid good money to have someone show that example of installing step flashing's to.
If one of my guys step flashed a wall and left pieces partially exposed accidentally or purposely I would make them tear it out and redo it.

It will not leak if you have some exposed spots like that, so long as you have proper over lap but it is a sure tell sign of a diy'er or jack of all trades installment and I can't stop laughing at how someone would push that off as a professional install.
 

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Ohming
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28 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks slyfox. I have seen this "staggering" effect occasionaly and always wondered if it was for show , practicality, or ignorance.
 

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Banned
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Possibly they were just trying to emphasize where the flashing is?
But probly not
I use shorter flashing but on every shingle for step flashing

I just had to install the step flashing betwen the addition & the existing roof. I still have the last 2 dozen pieces to install. About 32' of roof line all together - 2 levels
 

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Chicago, IL
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1,037 Posts
"Close enough for government work."
 

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Ohming
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28 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Alright, maybe I'm anal, but after reading all of the great advice, the question (perhaps I didn't propose it correctly) really wasn't answered. 14" step flashing should be used when?

I was just at the distributor who probobly moves many hundred of loads a season, and they claim that the longer 14" can be used every other row with, especially in tying to a side wall with existing shingles like I am doing. Sounds plausable to me. I guess they would be used as well in a low pitch high moisture enviroment as well? The 7 or 8" would surely be every other row.


Just trying to understand the science, if it exists.
 

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Alright, maybe I'm anal, but after reading all of the great advice, the question (perhaps I didn't propose it correctly) really wasn't answered. 14" step flashing should be used when?

I was just at the distributor who probobly moves many hundred of loads a season, and they claim that the longer 14" can be used every other row with, especially in tying to a side wall with existing shingles like I am doing. Sounds plausable to me. I guess they would be used as well in a low pitch high moisture enviroment as well? The 7 or 8" would surely be every other row.


Just trying to understand the science, if it exists.
Here is the deal. Step flashing is called step flashing because it goes up in steps. I have never seen the need or used 14" flashing.
I would be leary of useing it every other row of shingles. In fact if anyone told me that, I would laugh.
What are you saving by doing every other row? Nothing except a little cost!!!:thumbsup:
 

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Ohming
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28 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I am trying to disturb as few shingles as possible. Also as I (gently as possible) try to seperate the layers, some of the shingles have ripped and with the shingles being "3 dimensional" looking, some of the smaller pieces dont survive. Maybe I should cut them in half. But the fact that someone has not seen 14" before helps. Cost is not a consideration.
 

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Residential Roofer
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803 Posts
The metal holds up better against the water that gets in between the shingles when it is deflected off the wall, or when there's a damning issue along the wall 'ice or debris' that causes the water to run sideways.
Sometimes that water will get trapped and lay there until it evaporates and the metal protects the non exposed portion of the shingle during that process.

Standard 3-tabs and dimensional = 5"

Metric = 6"

Certain shingles such as Slate Line = 10"

Shakes, Tiles or Slates would be more likely for 14"
 

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Ohming
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28 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Excellent Slyfox!, thats what I was looking for. That info is worthy of a sticky thread for "numbers" nerdy people like me. Thanks
 

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The step flashing I picked up at HD is 8" long
Most of what I have used so far is leftover step flashing from skylights
They are 9.5" long, but I needed about 2 dozen more to finish
The bottom piece near the gutter should be "kick-out" flashing
This will direct water away from the siding/house & into the gutter

This one is pre-made
They say to cut a piece & bend it



Here's one not installed behind the siding

 

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Ohming
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28 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Very nice work Dave, A cold 6 pack is my bet that you can't do as good a job at my place! I printed the pics and will use tham as a guide. I'll post my results in a week or 2.
 

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Actually that's not my work, just some pics off the net
The 2nd pic I'm not sure why the flashing is not behind the siding
Possibly added after the fact

I do like that plastic diverter in the 1st pic
 
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