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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I'm a complete novice and I've been unable to find an answer anywhere. There is a copper pipe going into my laundry tub, and water continuously trickles from it. Is this normal? Is there some why to stop it.

The set up is this- the main line comes into the house, through the water meter and what appears to be a regulator, The very first branch off is to the cold water side of the laundry sink/tub.

the pipe runs along another couple feet then turns at a right angle and proceeds up the wall. The next branch is the mystery (to me) pipe, which runs back a couple feet to drain into the laundry tub. At the main line, it uses some sort of connector I've not seen before. (I am wondering if the rounded riged half dollar sized thing in front can be turned to shut it off).

About 6" above the the connector is the connector and valve for the washer, then the line goes throughout the rest of the house.

There is water continuously trickling from this copper pipe, and it makes a sound like the release of pressure- I've lived in this home several years, but only noticed this in the past 2 months. Did this used to be capped, and it fell off? Or is that round thing a valve I should adjust? Thanks in advance for any ideas at all, I'm completely lost!
 

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maybe

Maybe it's the condensation line from your AC -- usually drips outside but maybe they just put it into the utility sink.
 

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Yeah I was thinking maybe T&P too or....maybe a trap primer? But for the life of me I cant figure out why you'd have a trap primer at a utility sink unless it was just something that was never used. A pic would help alot
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here's a couple pics

Thanks for replying! I took a couple pictures. I hope this helps. One you can see the copper pipe running off the cold water line to the left and drains into the laundry tub. The other is a closer shot of the connection. I took them with a cell phone and tried attaching them-hopefully it works
 

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Looks like a pressure relief valve. Not a temp./pressure relief. What does the water line serve that the valve is attached to ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Kenmac, basically its the main water line once its in the house. After the meter & regulator, the line branches off to the cold water in the utility tub, then the next branch is this copper pipe trickling into the utility tub.

Above that, is the branch for the washer. Then above that it branches off in several directions to run throughout the house.

If I turn the water on in the utility tub, then water quits trickling from the piper, and I no longer hear any noise. But that only lasts a minute or two at best.

I think that, if I put a stopper in the tub, I could easily fill it in less than 24 hours just from the water constantly trickling out of the copper pipe-
 

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deleted I
 

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Although I've never seen it done. My guess it's a pressure relief. If it's after the house reg. If the pressure reg. were to go bad and allow too much pressure to other fixtures this valve would open to relieve the pressure.if you have a place b-4 the reg. That you can check water pressure,purchase a water pressure gauge & check inlet water pressure.if this is infact an over pressure decice. It should have the relief pressures on the valve somewhere. Unless, it had a tag that was removed.when you turn water on in the house. It is actually reliving line pressure. That is why it stopps leaking when you turn water on & starts leaking when water is turned off....pressure builds back up in the line & valve opens
 

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I'm not a pro, but I've never seen that kind of pressure relief valve on a main. A pressure regulator would make sense, but a relief valve? Looking at the picture, it appears that it may have been an added item vice original. The only reason I can think of for installing something like that (especially given the location) would be to eliminate water hammer. I agree with Kenmac on checking your street pressure. If it's OK, I think I'd get rid of the relief valve and maybe thread a water hammer arrestor into the female fitting if that is the real problem. If the pressure is high, replace the valve with a regulator.
 

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You never know what people will add.I have seen some strange things over the years. He said he has a pressure reg. If the pressure reg.has failed. it will allow what ever pressure is on the water main into the house unless the city has a back up reg. At the water meter (which I doubt) the only way to know is check pressures b-4 house reg. Cap this line & check pressure after reg.possibly at the washer
 

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That's a pressure relief valve for a well system. They're almost always set at 75 PSI.

If you have city water, there is no need for such a valve. The water pressure is maintained by the city system.

If you have a well pump, there has to be some sort of pressure relief valve installed in the system. If the pump sticks on, the pressure can build to hazardous levels, this valve is supposed to relieve pressure before something blows up.

If you're on city water, this valve in unnecessary. The house was likely on a well when it was built, hence the existence of the valve.

If the valve is leaking, either it is defective or the city water pressure is higher than 75 PSI. If the valve stops leaking when water is being used, the city regulator is likely not shutting off completely. For about $10, you can get a pressure gauge that screws on to a hose bibb, that'd be a good place to start.

Rob
 

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That's a pressure relief valve for a well system. They're almost always set at 75 PSI.

If you have city water, there is no need for such a valve. The water pressure is maintained by the city system.

If you have a well pump, there has to be some sort of pressure relief valve installed in the system. If the pump sticks on, the pressure can build to hazardous levels, this valve is supposed to relieve pressure before something blows up.

If you're on city water, this valve in unnecessary. The house was likely on a well when it was built, hence the existence of the valve.

If the valve is leaking, either it is defective or the city water pressure is higher than 75 PSI. If the valve stops leaking when water is being used, the city regulator is likely not shutting off completely. For about $10, you can get a pressure gauge that screws on to a hose bibb, that'd be a good place to start.

Rob

Exactly my thinking. I didn't know why someone would install such a relief on a house system.. Here you have to supply your own pressure reg. inside your home.. This mabe the case with him as he has stated he has a pressure reg. . I believe if he checks the water pressure . He will find his reg . is bad
 

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I'm more inclined to think that the PRV is bad. Try replacing it with a new one rated at the same pressure. They are available for under $10 at any hardware store.
 

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I wanted to say plug it up so you don't waste metered water.

The pitfall I saw was if you have a backflow preventer on the feed from the water main and no expansion tank for your water heater. This combination could lead to unusual pressure buildup in your system where a pressure relief valve would be needed.

Does twisting the plastic dial stop the trickle? If so adjust the dial to just at the point where the trickle stops.
 

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On the ones I've seen like that . It's not actually a knob that you can adjust.. It's more like a cap.. The relief in the valve is per set at the factory... Might be worth a shot to try.. I don't think I would force it to turn with water turned on incase it were to snap off
 

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Are you sure it's a pressure relief valve? It could be an auto trap primer. Everytime water is used it trickles water to keep the trap filled. Prehaps that sink wasn't used very often at one time and the trap was drying up.
 
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