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Hey,


I bought a curio cabinet at a sale. It did not come with a wall socket. See images - I can't for the life of me figure out what Electric Connector I need. Help? It is a Pulaski 2100 - I tried searching it without luck.


Thanks.


PS. Sorry if I may have posted this in the wrong section
 

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It looks like a NEMA 5-20P... but maybe not.

At second look, I don't think it's a 5-20P but perhaps something used abroad.

You will likely have to change it to a generic household 2 blade 125 volt plug. Might be easier to put a complete new proper cord on it.
 
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It looks like a NEMA 5-20P... but maybe not.

At second look, I don't think it's a 5-20P but perhaps something used abroad.

You will likely have to change it to a generic household 2 blade 125 volt plug.
I would be certain of its voltage before replacing the cords end. Any driver/transformer or just ordinary 120 volt lamps?
 

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It looks like a NEMA 5-20P... but maybe not.

At second look, I don't think it's a 5-20P but perhaps something used abroad.

You will likely have to change it to a generic household 2 blade 125 volt plug.
That's my thought exactly, it doesn't appear to be anything that standard in the US, I'm guessing it's for someplace overseas. Replacing it should be very simple and straightforward, I can't believe the cabinet draws much current. For that matter, are you even sure it's designed for 120v? I'm sure all you have is lighting circuits change the bulbs to something that are standard in the US should be simple also.
 

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What bulbs are in the curio cabinet? Can you read any information on them?
Any transformer in the cabinet? The label is a hint but who knows if that is accurate?
It actually looks like a 20 amp plug without the ground......but I have never seen one.
Is it possible that somewhere on the cabinet there is a receptacle for a plug like that?
I wonder if that isn't designed to plug into adjoining cabinets (aka daisy-chaining) so you can plug in one and connect the others in a row.
That would explain the odd plug.
 

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I believe I have seen these before on China cabinets. They were used to connect the top half to the bottom half, because the bottom half had the controls for the lights.

If it were me, I would cut it off and replace it with a 1-15 or 5-15 cord cap, but keep in mind, if there are no switches on the unit you'll need a way to turn them on or off, like maybe a plug in switch doohickey such as the one in this photo:


Sent from my new phone. Autocorrect may have changed stuff.
 

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To me it looks like a 30 amp 120 volt male cord cap. Be carefull is it possible the lights need that high amperage?

Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
 

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To me it looks like a 30 amp 120 volt male cord cap. Be carefull is it possible the lights need that high amperage?

Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
The label states 2.5 amps max at 120 volts.

I am 99.99% sure of what it is in my post above you. I remember moving a china cabinet with a connector like that.

Sent from my new phone. Autocorrect may have changed stuff.
 

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if there are no switches on the unit you'll need a way to turn them on or off, like maybe a plug in switch doohickey such as the one in this photo:
I was interested to see in post #6 a North American example of what in Australia/New Zealand is officially called a "socket adapter plug".
However, the Australian/NZ 3-pin equivalent is referred to colloquially, in Australia, as a "piggy-back plug" or, in New Zealand, as a "tap-on/tapon" plug.
(See https://www.showtechnix.co.nz/store/pdl-940/)

May I ask, what do you call these in North America?
 

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I was interested to see in post #6 a North American example of what in Australia/New Zealand is officially called a "socket adapter plug".
However, the Australian/NZ 3-pin equivalent is referred to colloquially, in Australia, as a "piggy-back plug" or, in New Zealand, as a "tap-on/tapon" plug.
(See https://www.showtechnix.co.nz/store/pdl-940/)

May I ask, what do you call these in North America?
I call them piggy back plugs. I don't see them here in the U.S. except on Christmas light strings and other decorative tack for the holiday. They encourage overloading a single outlet but usually Christmas lights aren't high wattage. I suppose they're no more dangerous than the 3-way plug in splitter cubes and the likes.
 

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That is an extension cord with a switch.
I was referring to a socket adapter plug, not the the whole cord and switch.

However, I now see that the whole device is not what I thought it was nor is it that of which I wrote.

What it is is a switch on the end of an extension cord with that switch controlling a socket outlet on the rear of the plug inserted into the wall socket outlet.
So, any device plugged into the switched socket outlet can be controlled by the switch on the end of the cord.

Previously I had not seen anything like that and would have expected to utilize an In Line Cord Switch, such as one of these - https://www.amazon.com/s?k=inline+s...x=in+line+switch,aps,397&ref=nb_sb_ss_sc_1_14

(When looking at the above reference, I was interested to note that there is a market for these type of devices in North America -
https://www.amazon.com/GE-Grounded-...2YJB4DCJ7RS&psc=1&refRID=EKN4N3TVW2YJB4DCJ7RS
Such items are not used in this country (nor in the UK) since all socket outlets are required to have associated switches.
See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AS/NZS_3112 )
 
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