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I found a time-capsule behind the hardboard on the wall with the medicine cabinet and lamp. Took me a minute to realize that it was an excuse for the cutout around the electrical box. I wonder if he was leaving that note to himself or anticipating that someone else would tear off the hardboard some day?

Most likely it was a note to his boss or buddy who was going to be coming in behind him to install the lighting. He was just acknowledging why he didn't do as crisp as job as usual. Although I can do better than that with just a jab saw :wink2:
 

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But the guy ar HD or Lowes will understand.) Regular (green kid) also comes premixed in a smaller box instead of a bucket withourt any green kid.)

OK, again, we need to distinguish between the types of compound. There is premixed, there is drying type, and there is setting type. They refer to different things. I don't know what box you're referring to, but almost always if it comes in a box that means it's a powder. If it's a powder then obviously it's not premixed.


Setting type compound needs to set to get hard. It also dries, but that's a different issue. Drying type compound needs to dry to get hard.


Both setting compound and drying compound come as a powder that you can mix yourself. Obviously only drying compound can come premixed. Setting compound can't be premixed or else it would be hard in the bucket by the time it leaves the factory. It would be wet for years in the bucket, but hard. Premixed can only be drying type compound. Powder can be either. The only reason I can think to use powder drying compound is that crews that do a lot of work can move a lot of that stuff much easier (it's way lighter). Also they can mix it to their own preferred thickness, especially if they want it thicker than it comes premixed. Not sure why you'd want that - it's pretty thick as it comes.
 

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I've used the same bucket of j/c for months or longer. If I know I'm going to store the mud for an extended time period I'll try to level off what's in the bucket and cover it with a thin layer of water.

That's all good advice. Additionally, it's a good idea to put a capful of bleach in there and mix it in. Oftentimes mold spores will start a colony in there and after a few weeks it will be a moldy mess.
 

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While I've heard of adding bleach, I've never done so. If I open an old bucket of mud and find mold I toss it .... or at least scrape off the top [and toss it out] until I get to clean mud.
 

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Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
I don't know what box you're referring to, but almost always if it comes in a box that means it's a powder.
If you look here, you'll see a 3.5 gallon box of premix.

https://www.usg.com/content/usgcom/en/products/walls/drywall/joint-compound/conventional-weight-joint-compounds/sheetrock-all-purpose-joint-compound.html

I saw a box like that yesterday at a paint store. I guess that's for people who don't want to accumulate a bunch of empty buckets? Boxes are cheaper to manufacture than buckets, and when stacked on a pallet there isn't nearly as much interstitial dead space that you get between the curved sides, so I guess it's cheaper to ship, too, on a per-pound basis, since more pounds would fit on a pallet. Maybe the savings is passed on to the buyer? And if you were cramming a lot of it into a work vehicle where space is tight, I think you could fit more in boxes.

Also, there may be a drop distance in which the corner of the box crushes but the bag inside doesn't burst, so the stuff would still be useable, when a bucket dropped the same distance would crack and ruin everything.
 

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Not all areas sell box mud. I haven't seen any in so long I don't remember the pricing. All the setting compounds I've used came in bags.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
First of all, I really wish people would stop calling this "dry time". It is NOT dry time. It's setting time.
Yes, people fail to make the same distinction about epoxy. It's a little annoying, but more often than not, people know what's happening and just use the term sloppily, I hope.

Although, last night I was watching a video of a guy using a mixed compound (it showed him mixing it at the beginning) and after rolling some on the wall, he was talking about it "drying" as he was working (i.e. he was worried that it would dry too much) but then he went back into the bucket, so either he mixed more off camera or that really was a drying product made from powder. Not sure if I can immediately find that scene again, and he was in Canada so the products are slightly different.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
These are slang and misnomer terms, respectively. "Hot mud" means setting compound as opposed to drying compound. See my previous post. "Green lid" is an unfortunate term because it refers to the color of one brand only. For example, all of the pictures at the bottom are of "green lid" joint compound. What they are trying to say is "premixed drying joint compound".
For some reason I can't remember at the moment, I was thinking of using that USG Plus 3 instead of the actual green lid. Pro vs con?
 

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Initially I use the "green lid", premixed mud. Sticks well, has long enough work time for my slow and picky application. Sometimes I use the faster/lighter pre mix for finishing work, because it sets faster and sands easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
I should add that I'm not averse to having two compounds. If I buy a $10 bag of setting type and only use 1/4 of it, I'm not going to cry! It is too bad that it's wasteful, but I just regret having to send most of it to the dump later.

When working on our other bathroom, I actually kinda enjoyed mixing up thinset mortar and grout, even if that and cleanup is a waste of time (and water).

When I took off the trim around the door frames, I found gaps up to 1/2" or so between the drywall and the frame. I was thinking of repairing those with this method.

Not because I have to, but because it seems like the right thing to do, just in case I want to change the door trim to something narrower or whatever.

I was thinking I could use USG Silver Set for that and a first coat over the wall to level the torn paper and the thin bits of hardboard adhesive I didn't get off, then apply a premixed topping compound for easier sanding. How 'bout that idea?
 

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If you look here, you'll see a 3.5 gallon box of premix.

https://www.usg.com/content/usgcom/en/products/walls/drywall/joint-compound/conventional-weight-joint-compounds/sheetrock-all-purpose-joint-compound.html

I saw a box like that yesterday at a paint store. I guess that's for people who don't want to accumulate a bunch of empty buckets? Boxes are cheaper to manufacture than buckets, and when stacked on a pallet there isn't nearly as much interstitial dead space that you get between the curved sides, so I guess it's cheaper to ship, too, on a per-pound basis, since more pounds would fit on a pallet. Maybe the savings is passed on to the buyer? And if you were cramming a lot of it into a work vehicle where space is tight, I think you could fit more in boxes.

Also, there may be a drop distance in which the corner of the box crushes but the bag inside doesn't burst, so the stuff would still be useable, when a bucket dropped the same distance would crack and ruin everything.

I'd say you probably nailed it pretty well. Obviously there is a plastic bag in there. I've never seen those boxes in my area except with powder in them.
 

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Yes, people fail to make the same distinction about epoxy. It's a little annoying, but more often than not, people know what's happening and just use the term sloppily, I hope.

Yup, you would hope. In my experience, a lot of the people don't really understand what's happening though, which is why I get on the soapbox. Present company excluded of course :)


Although, last night I was watching a video of a guy using a mixed compound (it showed him mixing it at the beginning) and after rolling some on the wall, he was talking about it "drying" as he was working (i.e. he was worried that it would dry too much) but then he went back into the bucket, so either he mixed more off camera or that really was a drying product made from powder. Not sure if I can immediately find that scene again, and he was in Canada so the products are slightly different.
Well I almost always mix my premixed compound, to get it smoother. So that might have been what he was doing. But even if it was setting compound, I actually think that's a pretty interesting side topic. For sure, some setting compound can dry before it has a chance to set. (The same thing can happen with things like thinset when tiling, etc.) I don't really know if it reaches full strength if it dries too quickly (we're talking about the very thin edges of where you apply it.) The thicker sections can't dry in the 20 or 45 minute set time. But I guess full strength isn't very important on the edges, it's mostly important where the tape and joint are.
 

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For some reason I can't remember at the moment, I was thinking of using that USG Plus 3 instead of the actual green lid. Pro vs con?

I think if you listen to the company, it's better in every way. In real life, it's a lighter weight compound, and according to the laws of physics that's going to be a lighter weight finished compound as well. Easier to sand, easier to get scratches in, not as strong with the first embedded tape coat. I guess if it's strong enough, then using something stronger doesn't help. I suppose it's a matter of risk - maybe there is 10% more chance the joints will crack in the future, I don't know. A lighter compound is more fun to carry, I can tell you that much. Personally I might use standard for the first coat, then this stuff for the next 2 coats. But I don't think it makes for a harder finish and harder wall.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
I was thinking I could use USG Silver Set for that and a first coat over the wall to level the torn paper and the thin bits of hardboard adhesive I didn't get off, then apply a premixed topping compound for easier sanding. How 'bout that idea?
Looks like again I'm not describing this very well. I mentioned the Plus 3 above in case I just go with one all-purpose compound. But maybe I should do it right (?) and use a setting compound to fix the edges and set the corner tape, then finish with something easier to sand.

I haven't really made this choice yet. I don't have to choose for a couple of days if I decide to tear out the dubious ceiling material first (see my other thread).
 

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I don't see any reason to use any setting compound at all. All Purpose all the way around is fine. The main reasons to use setting compound are if you're on a schedule and have to get this done in one calendar day, or if you need extra strength for some reason. Neither apply.
 
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