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I am gathering opinion regarding a problem I am having with a part I am having produced and need an expert opinion. It is an aluminum plate welded to an outer rail of a long shelving unit. it appears they attached this plate for cosmetic reasons with a series of tack welds. these tacks welds run the entire length and are parallel. i am wondering if that is the best distribution (parallel) of tack welds? also, why is it warping or fluxing and shipping? whats the difference between spot welds and tacks? see fellas, im lost..
 

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A spot weld is where two pieces of metal are clamped together, with spot welder jaws. A current is then passed thru the welder to heat the metal, joining both pieces.

A tack weld is when two pieces of metal are joined with a series of welds from an arc source(stick weld, MIG, TIG). This may be a temporary weld to properly align parts before they are welded with a complete bead. If the parts are not structural or carrying some sort of load, the tacks may be sufficient to hold things in place.

Metals often warp when heated, if the flatness of the parts is critical, there are ways to limit the problem. If it is not critical, they warp.
 

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Ayuh,.... 'n to add to what Bill said,...

Spot welds are done to Steel, Not aluminum...

why is it warping or fluxing and shipping?
It'll warp from the heat of weldin', 'n is probably the reason for a series of tack welds...

Fluxin', 'n shippin',..??..??
 
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