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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As we've seen in my previous thread, First 2 projects, the bathroom was completed a while ago. I've been working on the rest of it. I've done a large part of it myself. I've also had help from the good people here. In addition, I did have an electrician work with me. Painting begins this weekend.

Here's what it looked like 10 years ago:



The far wall is wired for a flat screen and sound. I've also wired for a projector.



The new doorway to the mechanicals room. I originally made the door wider and then realized it wouldn't matter if I couldn't get things through the basement door. (duh)



Screen wall that's been drywalled.



Now we see the other end of the room. Note how far away from the wall the HVAC is located. Also follow the main stack through the wall and the middle of the aforementioned bathroom. I moved the HVAC and extended the stack to the end of the room and then made a right.


You can see the new location for the HVAC. The soffits are 7'10 above the floor. The main ceiling is 9 feet. Also, the basement ducts have been installed.



Another picture with the new HVAC. The elevated box is for the right speaker in the 7.1 system.



This is the bar area. You can see the wall of the bathroom



This is closeup of the bar. You can follow the stack through the soffit. You can also see where I cut the pipe.



Same area with drywall.



10 Picture limit. To be continued in next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Behind the bar. Plumbing for a sink and dishwasher. GFCI all around.



Down the hallway towards the bottom of the stairs. I'm putting cabinets and a wine cooler in the nook in the back wall.



This is the electronics nook. Yes, that's the same TV in the first picture.



With drywall.



This will be the exercise room



Drywalled

 

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Discussion Starter #5
That's correct. I used adhesive on all the studs. The screws hold it until the adhesive dries.
 

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I'm not positive but I thought there was still a fastener pattern that you had to follow even if using adhesive. Could be wrong. Maybe someone else will chime in. Did you get this inspected? Not criticizing your work, just kinda curious.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That's ok. I don't mind comments in either direction. You'll note there are more in the ceiling than on the walls. There are nails under the tape as well. I was told, as long as I was using adhesive, 2 screws, every other stud, will be fine for the walls. Lastly, I took pictures in the middle of the process. There are a couple of wall shots that don't look like they have any screws in the field because they hadn't been covered with compound.
 

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Nice job
I wasn't aware you could use adhesive instead of all screws
That would save some mudding
Here they only check your rough electric, rough framing, then insulation. After that it's the final inspection
 

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Newbie Bill
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Nice report and nice work.

I am going to subsribe to this thread.

Can't wait to see the finished product.
 

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Professional Wood Shafter
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Framing looks nice and square!. Curious on your drywall screwing patterns even with adhesive how often did you screw ??
 

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Discussion Starter #13
All of the drywall is attached around the perimeter. The pieces on the walls have 2 screws ever other stud.
The ceilings have screws on every stud.
 

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Since there are so many questions on screw placement..... the wallboard manufacturer recommends (code), studs 16"o.c.- one screw every 24"( sheets on side: a screw top, middle and bottom of every stud).

Ceilings 16"o.c. - 1 screw every 16"

Page 9- table 7: http://www.gypsum.org/pdf/GA-216-07.pdf

Check with your local building department about the gas furnace and water heater. You probably need a weatherstripped door and an exterior combustion air source for them, for your safety.

For anyone else doing a basement, check here, about where to install the insulation vapor barrier, per your location. A very informative read:

http://www.buildingscience.com/docu...rol-for-new-residential-buildings?full_view=1

Nice looking job, bet you can't wait to get it finished. Have you noticed how the room looks bigger, then smaller, then..... as the walls/ceilings are finished? Be safe, G
 

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Discussion Starter #16
A few more pictures with paint and cabinets. Carpeting will be installed shortly. (Can you tell I'm a NY Giants fan?) The microwave cabinet for under the bar should be arriving this week.











 

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ya look'n good. i like how you got all the right tools, this is half the battle (the other half is making sure your wife is happy with the results).

Knucklez
 

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Discussion Starter #19
ym,
Thanks for the kind words. Once I get some of my Giants memorabilia up, the colors will make more sense. My wife gave me the classic "you've got to be kidding me" look when I told her the color scheme. She had "other plans". Now that the walls are done, she has warmed to the idea.

Gbar,
I've been told that a louvered door will provide enough combustion air in the space. I've installed CO detectors just to make sure.

Knucklez
I'm a firm believer in using the right tool for the job. I rarely make a purchase for only one job so they end up paying for themselves in the long run.

Tonight's goal is painting the baseboards and the single french door that I installed last night at the top of the stairs. I hope to have *only* 7 projects left by the end of the weekend.
 

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Hello all,

I just found this posting and the basement looks great! And it is a little late for your situation because I am guessing it is complete so this is for people that may view this discussion.

I was looking at the pictures of this project and I would say that in our municipality per code your screw pattern would fail inspection and we utilize the 2007 IBC.

The code for screw patterns reads 4- 6" on edges and not to exceed 8" in the field. I recognize the use of adhesive however that is an extra touch and the screw pattern should remain the same. I don't use nor have I ever seen adhesive unless laminating drywall onto masonry walls but that is just me. If I ever have to strip the drywall the adhesive would just be an added PIA to deal with. There is no real reason for the adhesive other than it should help prevent nail pops however if you are using screws the lateral movement of the drywall should be eliminated especially if the screw pattern is tight enough.

Not criticizing just giving my input on the screw subject.
 
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