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Needing to insulate the floor of my (stationary) RV for the cold, wet Washington winter. Would it help if I installed the carpet "face down" to trap heat or does it make a difference? Whether the carpet is face down or face up would it be best to put padding on top or bottom? Like I said... weird question... Thanks!
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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Be like a Maine farmer, place hay or straw bales around the perimeter to keep the wind from blowing under the trailer.

Sent from my RCT6213W22 using Tapatalk
 

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Naildriver
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Welcome to the forums. Certainly as times goes on, your questions will be more logical. How would turning the carpet upside down and putting the padding on top help, in your opinion?
 

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place hay or straw bales around the perimeter
Sounds like perfect conditions and nesting material for mice and other vermin?

Maybe building a skirt from a rot resistant material, like PVC or pressure treated wood, is better? Could keep it temporary by holding in place with stacked cement blocks?

One thing is for sure: up or down, carpet isn't going to do much to trap heat.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
@rjniles...built a perimeter with bales of island hay (super dense hay) and added a layer of flame retardant visqueen between the hay and RV (trying to ward off mold)
@chandler48...just spitting out questions and thoughts as they come to mind. just moved to the island from a big city so my ideas are going to be ridiculous at times. grasping at straws so to speak. seeing as I am a pauper I'm trying to use what i have at a hand.

thanks guys!:smile:
 

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Heat rises. Once you've blocked airflow under the RV, floor insulation becomes less important than wall and (especially) ceiling insulation.

But it's still an issue. Carpet will certainly help if feel much more comfortable. Not so sure flipping it over will do anything. Plus, I'd be surprised if it's symmetrical enough to do that.

Putting down another layer of foam or anything that insulates will certainly help. Putting it under the existing carpet, if possible, will look better.

I've done the hay bale thing. And yes, the mice love it. Ants, too. I like the idea of an impervious seal behind it. Wish I'd thought if that. Also consider that you need to keep moisture from sitting against the structure or things will rot. Even with a metal shell, a lot of old campers have a wood frame.
 

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Naildriver
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How long and wide is the RV? Even metal roofing, cut to sill height and fastened in place would help stem the air flow.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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As long as I stay on my couch or bed I'm warm and cozy. It's the floor that's freezing...
I buy fleece lined rubber soled slippers. Also called Moccasins.:devil3:

Keeps my toes warm, and protected from anything that has fallen on my floor.

What good is carpet padding on top of the carpet?


ED
 

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No insulation will help if inside is not heated. Carpet, installed the usual way, will help best with how cold anything is going to feel under foot. Anything solid will transmit the temps, so nothing like solid material flooring. Area rugs, runners, even the carpet padding will make it feel less cold. 2x on slippers.
 

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Naildriver
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Nik, how would you balance yourself to walk on it? Walk on padding???!!
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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Nik, how would you balance yourself to walk on it? Walk on padding???!!
That, and it deteriorates quickly, with boot traffic on it.

I realize that most of their traffic will be without any shoe, but they still need boots / shoes any time that they are leaving or entering their home.

ED
 

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Lifelong Fix'r
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As long as I stay on my couch or bed I'm warm and cozy. It's the floor that's freezing...
Being one of those folks whose feet are always cold in the winter, I was delighted when I discovered these:
https://www.amazon.com/Safety-Works-CTFM-insoles-Infused/dp/B005ZUI7N2

I have a pair in my indoor slippers and another pair that go in my outdoor boots. They won't guarantee warm feet if your slippers and/or boots aren't warmly insulated to begin with, but they sure will protect your feet when you're walking on cold surfaces.

Just make sure you get the right size. You can trim them to fit your footwear but, if you get a size that has to be trimmed too much, the insulating material will leak out.
 

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This can be very complicated and if you don't pay attention to where the moisture is going, you can end up with a disaster. You need climate-specific information and this is often most readily available from a local land grant university. Fault that, a local energy rater should be able to tell you what to do and whether it is a good investment.

In some climates you put the moisture barrier outside of the insulation (usually cooling environments), and in another, inside the insulation (usually primarily heating climates). The moisture barrier, if you are going to have one, needs to be opposite the drying side. In some places, it is hard to win. You have to be especially careful to avoid two moisture barriers trapping moisture in sensitive layers in between.

I am guessing this is a moist environment year round. If heating in the winter and cooling (or dehumidifying) in the summer, the easiest way is to seal the floor up on the outside with high density spray foam. This will dry to the inside. More inexpensively, but more labor intensive, you can attach insulation (batt or panels) and if the insulation has not a vapor barrier, cover it over with a vapor barrier. Be sure to tape well the seams in any panels to seal them.

Alternatively, you can skip the insulation and couple the home to the ground which is almost always at a more moderate temperature than the air. If you do this, you will probably need to install a moisture barrier at the floor and then make a sealed crawlspace between that and the ground with a vapor barrier at the ground (heavy plastic with a bit of pebble ballast) as well.

I stress again, beware installing more than one vapor barrier. In a floor assembly, vapor barriers can be sheet or tile vinyl flooring, carpet backing, and even paint or other wood floor finishes so watch it. More stress on the fact that your local land grant university may short circuit this whole decision process for you and have a solution or two for mobile homes at the ready. That'd be my first move.
 

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I read about aerogel and how excellent it is. But not practical since the cost is sky high. As an insole, I wonder if it may be too good? I prefer cooler since my feet runs hot.:smile: Once the boots are on, body heat should be enough.
 
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