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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
We just bought a house and we are thinking about remodeling the Bathroom. I enjoy very hot and steamy showers. I will install a large vent fan through the attic and out the roof but it would only be used after the shower is complete, NEVER DURING.

First, Demo the room down to the studs and joists.

After that, I was thinking of using a moisture barrier inside all six faces of the room and cutting slits into the floor side to allow for drainage of possible condensation.

Then I would lay down a couple of layers of Hardie 500 board (glue under the first set and thinset and tape under any others) and maybe a backer board to replace the sub-flooring (depending on the current floor thickness). The finished flooring would be Vinyl.

Lastly, I would also use Backer board on the walls and ceiling. They would be painted with a good, rubber based paint.

Any ideas on if,
this is doable
or,
any reasons on why I shouldn't?
 

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Drywall contractor
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Slits in the floor to drain where??? The basement/crawl space? Not a good idea. Just asking for mold problems, for one thing. Laminate is not a good idea in wet areas.
You just need to build a steam enclosure for your shower.
 

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You lost me, too, on the drainage slits. When you say laminate, are you referring to the fake wood floors, or lanolium? Either way, with all the work you're doing, I'd do tile.

For the ceiling vent, make sure to run that through the attic and out the roof. Don't just vent it into the attic.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Slits in the floor to drain where???
I made a few changes to my 1st post. I hope that helps to clear things up.

When you say laminate, are you referring to the fake wood floors, or lanolium? Either way, with all the work you're doing, I'd do tile.
Vinyl, not laminate. Darn typos ;)

For the ceiling vent, make sure to run that through the attic and out the roof. Don't just vent it into the attic.
I will.
 

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I, too, am confused as to where the water from the slits is going to go to. Your first major mistake is not running the exhaust fan "during" the shower. You are allowing steam to turn to drops, that will not be taken out of the room. If you have "damaged conventional methods", I would go back and make sure you you performed them correctly.
 

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I have gas!
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I have damaged conventional, proven methods a few times over the years. I want something better that can handle me for my own house.
Maybe you should install a steam sauna. It's designed for what you want.
Edit: Another idea, maybe you can wrap the entire bathroom with a membrane as if the entire bathroom is a shower using a product like Shluter Kerdi.
 

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We just bought a house and we are thinking about remodeling the Bathroom. I enjoy very hot and steamy showers. I will install a large vent fan through the attic and out the roof but it would only be used after the shower is complete, NEVER DURING.

First, Demo the room down to the studs and joists.

After that, I was thinking of using a moisture barrier inside all six faces of the room and cutting slits into the floor side to allow for drainage of possible condensation.

Then I would lay down a couple of layers of Hardie 500 board (glue under the first set and thinset and tape under any others) and maybe a backer board to replace the sub-flooring (depending on the current floor thickness). The finished flooring would be Vinyl.

Lastly, I would also use Backer board on the walls and ceiling. They would be painted with a good, rubber based paint.

Any ideas on if,
this is doable
or,
any reasons on why I shouldn't?

If you are installing a vinyl floor, I wouldn't waste your time on Hardie backer board. Put down a good sanded plywood over your subfloor. Build the shower properly and you won't have to worry about condensation.
 
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