DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

Water softner ?

328 7
I need to replace my existing unit. Older, but seems to have worked fine. Single tank single salt reservoir. Looking at new designs I see folks still selling the single tank, but I see the "upgraded" options of dual tanks and HE resins that they say use less salt.

What benefit do you get from the dual resin tanks and does the HE version resing really cut salt usage by 50% or so as they say? thanks Brian
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
3,432 Posts
Have you ever tested the hardness of your water just prior to a regen cycle?
It could be your salt setting is too high to begin with wasting salt.

What I did, and it made a big difference, was to keep lowering the salt setting till I saw the hardness in the water just prior to a regen raise a little, then I just nuged it a bit higher.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Have you ever tested the hardness of your water just prior to a regen cycle?
It could be your salt setting is too high to begin with wasting salt.

What I did, and it made a big difference, was to keep lowering the salt setting till I saw the hardness in the water just prior to a regen raise a little, then I just nuged it a bit higher.
It's working fine, just very old unit. I am 66 this month and want to replace it now before I am too old to deal with it and go digital controls etc.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,432 Posts
It's working fine, just very old unit. I am 66 this month and want to replace it now before I am too old to deal with it and go digital controls etc.
Yea I understand, mine is a mechanical head 14 yrs old, so I have no knowledge about the newer systems.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
7,676 Posts
Test your raw water and get a unit that will work for it.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
Can't comment on the dual tank etc but one thing that saves a ton of salt is the tracking ability or on demand recharge. They meter the incoming water then regen only when needed based on the hardness set in the menu vs some of the older units that were on a fixed schedule. Currently have an all in one unit with the tank and salt in the same container and really have no complaints with it. Billed for about 5K gallons a month in water and maybe need 1 bag of salt every 1.5 - 2 months? Hardness is around 14 gpg if I remember correctly.
 

· Usually Confused
Joined
·
10,534 Posts
It's working fine, just very old unit. I am 66 this month and want to replace it now before I am too old to deal with it and go digital controls etc.
If it's working fine and the water is to your liking, I'd leave it. The older clockwork meter controls were a lot more basic, but as with most appliances, the older stuff was built better.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
It's working fine, just very old unit. I am 66 this month and want to replace it now before I am too old to deal with it and go digital controls etc.
If it's working fine and the water is to your liking, I'd leave it. The older clockwork meter controls were a lot more basic, but as with most appliances, the older stuff was built better.
I understand "before I am too old" but also rather agree with the second. I had a 1985 water heater, kept running fine, until suddenly leaking. Huh? Ah...city changed to anti-back flush water meters, kills water heaters without an expansion tank. I opened that old thing to clean it-nothing. No rust no dirt. If the city hadn't changed from their old shitty valves to new shitty valves (which even the city could not shut off the water flow completely) I think that old heater would still be kicking along. Kinda like the shop tools my grandpa bought in the 1930s and we were using 60 years later, better than new, his 16" radial arm saw made NO noise, ZERO except the hiss of air being cut by the blade. Anyway the point of this ramble is changing your well working unit to a newer one might result in having to change the new one again anyway.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top