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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi i am very new with well water ... and guess i should have look at this when i moved in to this house ... a year ago .. i used to have town water or aka public water they call it .. but in this part of the area i moved in .. its well water ..

there is a system in the basement and i am having hardwater .. i tested using a TDS meter and it shows close to 330ppm ..

i know that value is no good and i do see hard water stains on the tape and the shower is stained yellow .. and i will need to maybe add a 3 stage filter into this system persay .. but first .. this system i have .. can someone advice me, i am very new in well water setup .. can i add a water softener to this setup or do i need to replace the whole setup here with something like this from Home Depot

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Caveat that I don't know anything about non-salt softeners, but it does look like one I found online. Hardness is primarily caused by dissolved calcium and manganese, not iron. Most softeners will remove some iron but that's not really what they are designed for. You say you measured 330ppm (I am assuming before the equipment - like at the pressure tank), but of what? 330 is pretty much an off-the-dial number. regardless of what you are measuring. I would do a more detailed water analysis before spending more money. It looks like you have two of those devices in series. If they're not doing it for you, I'm not sure a third one would.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
a third i was thinking of adding a water softener system .. with the salt tank .. thats what i am thinking .. if the first two are only removing some of the mineral .. and not doing much on the hardness .. i was thinking of adding a 3rd system.


i ordered a water test kit .. and waiting for it ... i use a TDS meter something like this

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GE Water Softener GXSH 40V
Hard water with Positive charge (Cations) minerals Magnesium/Calcium enters Mineral Tank which is full of plastic Resin beads and negative charged (Anions) which attract the Cations and "softens" (demineralizes) the Water.
The Resin Tank Beads build up with the C/M +ions and are Recharged with Salt (brine) water from Storage Tank.
Mineral Tank is Flushed with water to the Drain.
Well Sir, if that is the only regret, it can be resolved by a minor investment of a simple installation.
I've installed 3 so far in 36 years of my self constructed Domicile.
 

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Nice that the GE model has an integral sediment filter.

OP still has to deal with his iron issue.
 

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I’ve been in our current house since 1986. We have used an iron remover system and just last year we had to get a new system installed. It’s basically a similar system to a water softener which uses salt to remove the iron. This system uses air injection to remove iron. It backwashes every 6 days to flush the media tank. The size of tank and time to regeneration is determined by the iron content.




Retired guy from Southern Manitoba, Canada.
 

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21 yrs servicing systems. That’s not a softener. It’s technically a conditioner. The salt factor makes it a softener. Don’t be fooled that you’ll be able to avoid the salt. The issue you have is two fold. 1, No media can continually remove calcium and lime (hardness) 2, You have no control valves to flush the systems out. Those are just in our heads on there. Those type systems are expected to be either rebed often or thrown away completely. Culligan used to do them, they were called exchange tanks. As in we’ll show up every so often and exchange them for a reded set of tanks. $$$$. Never really worked good. How much water you gonna use tomorrow? Yeah, no idea. That’s the issue. It’s a sad attempt to sell an unrealistic product. Get a head on one, get it rebed with ion exchange resin and make it a softener. That should handle hardness and iron if set correctly. I like clack brand heads. Easy to fix and used all over. Comes in various configurations but the same guts.. UPFLOW HEADS ARE THE BEST. If they’re big enough. What 660catman has may work for you IF the calcium levels are low enough. Like no more then 15 grains. The level of calcium in the water can void warranties. STAY AWAY FROM GE UNITS. THEY‘RE JUST THROW AWAYS IF NOT ON VERY TAME WATER.

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I have had a Fleck softener for 11 yrs now, all I add is salt to a tank. Never had any issues at all. I tested the water about 2 months ago and still no hardness.
Same resin as well.
I am thinking about either replacing the resin for about $138 or just get a whole new system for about $473, still debating.
I can just see me replacing the resin and then the head goes bad, or the salt tank splits, or other mechanism in that tank.

Unit I have... 32000 grain
 

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I have had a Fleck softener for 11 yrs now, all I add is salt to a tank. Never had any issues at all. I tested the water about 2 months ago and still no hardness.
Same resin as well.
I am thinking about either replacing the resin for about $138 or just get a whole new system for about $473, still debating.
I can just see me replacing the resin and then the head goes bad, or the salt tank splits, or other mechanism in that tank.

Unit I have... 32000 grain
Yep, its about due, keep an eye on it and when it starts losing effectiveness get a new one. I'm on my 3rd one in 36 years an I'm chang'n it out as soon as I get a good deal, $300 to $400, scratch 'n dent, open box, etc.
But then I'm an old school tight ass...keep da faith dude...
 
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