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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
have massive 70 x 30 patio in my back yard, it is always puddling water. We use as a basketball court and it makes it un-usable for 2 days every time it rains for an hour.

what are my options, can i just try putting a round 8" hole or so, in the center of where it puddles and put in a drain cover and hope the water will find its way down to the dirt under the slab?

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I’m no expert. I see the leaves falling off trees there. Are you in the north? What’s gonna happen when that water under the slab freezes? My guess it will expand and possibly crack the concrete, then when it thaws, over many seasons, it will sink and just keep eroding under it. My uneducated DIY fix would be to rent a concrete saw and slice lines into it to the nearest edge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
you cant squigee and play right away, you squigee and wait 30 minutes and play, but that also only works if the sun is out. the kids go out to play several times a day, its not something they can really do on their own at this age. and looking for a solution that would also have us look in our backyard and not see a puddle about 30% of the time.

yes im in the north, but the concrete is 14 years old, so the freezing puddles dont seem to be an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I was thinking make a 4 foot x 10” hole or so , fill it with drainage pebbles and then put some sort of drain cover on it. Or making some more expansion joints .
 

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If you want a fix that's going to last for some time to come, I think the only option you have is to install at least 2 drains, and pipe them out to daylight. Meaning, renting a saw and cutting trenches at least 10" wide to both puddles, and extending that trench all the way to the closest edge of the patio. Install pipe and drains, fill back over pipe with stone or gravel, install a few dowels into the existing concrete, and pour and finish concrete into said trenches.

Cutting extra control joints rarely, if ever, works long term, because their too small and fill with deris quickly, and need constant cleaning.

Installing a dry well, like you mentioned, rarely works either, unless the ground underneath takes water very quickly.
 

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I'm in Florida and have a covered carport with the same issue with blowing rain.
the back-pack leaf blower makes quick work of removing water.
is also good for drying off the Harley after you wash it.
(a cheaper option would be the standard wet/dry ShopVac).
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I should mention as well, THIS is the exact reason why ALL exterior concrete needs adequate pitch. I've been asked numerous times over the years to do half court + basketball courts in customer's back yards, and I hardly ever get the job because I insist on 2% pitch in one direction on all exterior concrete. Most homeowners can't grasp having their kids possibly play on "THAT MUCH PITCH!" Someone else gets the job and they end up playing in water puddles, like this, instead..........
 

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Cut a channel and install a steel grate on top all the way to the edge of the slab so it can drain.

You see similar on patios near pools so that splashed water goes away. You'll just have to flush it out once a year to remove debris/leaves, etc.

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yes im in the north, but the concrete is 14 years old, so the freezing puddles dont seem to be an issue
I'm pretty sure he meant freezing under the slab if you don't pipe the drain away.

You have to decide if having a drain grate is suitable or safe for the use the pad get put to.
 

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OK I’m just trying to think outside the box and maybe this is way too much cut the slab down the middle and then get the guy with the foam injection that levels Or raises the slab to slope the slab 2° from the center


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You could have a concrete or asphalt overlay added to correct the slope.

Personally, I would just buy a squeegee. If they're old enough to play basketball by themselves, they should be able to use the squeegee (My 11 year old daughter, who weighs 45 lbs can). If not, whatever adult is with them can handle it.
 

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Injection jacking will lift the entire slab, not just the low parts. Twenty bucks for a squeegee or a few grand to try and fix - I know what my decision would be.
 
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