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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi All, I'm 4 days into moving to a new house and have since found some pretty poor water pressure issues.




  1. Its mainly on the second floor
  2. Both hot and cold
  3. We have well water with a pressure pump
Now I did some basic googling and found that the pressure pump maybe needed to be adjusted, more air added etc.



When I checked it out yesterday it was at 30/50 and the pressure was 25 psi. so I adjusted the pressure switch to 40/60 and added more air so that the pressure is now at 38. All which seems to be the recommended guidance.


Pressure maybe MAYBE got a bit better but still only a trickle at the farthest away faucet
... I'm kinda out of my area here... Advice?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Have you checked the aerators on the faucets? They may be clogged.

Chris
I did think of that tonight only to realize they need some special “key” thingy in order to get them out ... BUT it doesn’t seem like clogged aerators ... I’ll swing by Lowe’s tomorrow and see if they have the key

Oh and another thing which says it’s not the aerators is that the brand new washer machine also complains about low water pressure; so I really gotta get this fixed!
 

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That is a bladder tank. The water is pumped into the bladder which is inside the tank. The bladder has ruptured and the air between the bladder and the tank has been absorbed by the water (which water will do, especially water under pressure) You can compress air, you cannot compress water.


What improvement you saw came from adding air.


So your bladder ruptured and the air between the bladder and the tank was gradually absorbed by the water in the tank. As more air is absorbed it takes more and more water to reach highest pressure. (Well tanks work on a range of pressure). As water is used, it takes less and less water usage for the pressure drop to reach the cut on pressure. Your water pressure actually comes from the compressed air in the tank not from your well pump.


If you had not added air, eventually the pump would have come on as soon as you open a faucet and turned off as soon as you closed a faucet.



The tank is a storage tank, it stores water until needed. Most likely your pump alone cannot provide all the water you need at any given time. It pumps water into the tank until the air in the tank is compressed to the maximum pressure. It turns back on when the air in the tank reaches the minimum pressure.


How much water you store depends on the size of the tank. The more water you store reduces the number of times your well pump has to come on and go off. It is the number of starts and stops that determine the life of a well pump not the running time.


Replace your well tank or eventually you will be replacing the well pump also..

Until then, turn off your pump and drain your tank. Fill you tank with 40# of air pressure. Turn pump back on. That will keep you going until that air is absorbed.


This will keep you going for a short period of time without damage to the pump until you can replace the tank.


Replace with the largest tank you can afford and have room for.
 

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PS

so I adjusted the pressure switch to 40/60 and added more air so that the pressure is now at 38.
Open a faucet and watch how fast that pressure gauge drops. And remember you are measuring water pressure, not water volume. Your tank should be between 1/2 and 2/3 thirds full of water when pump turns off. Depending on the switch settings.
 

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A bad bladder in the tank will just make the pump short cycle not lower the pressure.
What size lines where ran?
All the main runs should have been at least 3/4", if there 1/2" then you have 1/2 the avalible flow.
 

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It is not a matter of pressure, it is a matter of water volume or lack thereof. Most pumps cannot pump the required volume for the entire house. And yes, the pump will short cycle as the air in the tank between the bladder and the tank is absorbed.
 

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I did think of that tonight only to realize they need some special “key” thingy in order to get them out ... BUT it doesn’t seem like clogged aerators ... I’ll swing by Lowe’s tomorrow and see if they have the key

Oh and another thing which says it’s not the aerators is that the brand new washer machine also complains about low water pressure; so I really gotta get this fixed!
Consider the washer filter screens in the hose ends ( if applicable ) could also be partially plugged. And if you check these it may be a good idea to determine if one is worse than the other, Hot or Cold.
 

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Checking the aerators/screens is the cheapest and easiest first step to determine if you are lacking pressure or it just seems like it. If they are really clogged, you might consider a whole-house filter and perhaps getting your water tested. If you are new to the house, you have no idea if the previous owners ever cleaned them.

Make sure you pre-charge the tank the proper way. It looks like it may be printed on the tank. If not , readily available online.
 

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Just a thought as I don’t have one, but would a water softener not cause some restriction? A reno I did next door had one and the PO bypassed it. Turns out there was two plugged screens in it.


Retired guy from Southern Manitoba, Canada.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
That is a bladder tank. The water is pumped into the bladder which is inside the tank. The bladder has ruptured and the air between the bladder and the tank has been absorbed by the water (which water will do, especially water under pressure) You can compress air, you cannot compress water.


What improvement you saw came from adding air.


So your bladder ruptured and the air between the bladder and the tank was gradually absorbed by the water in the tank. As more air is absorbed it takes more and more water to reach highest pressure. (Well tanks work on a range of pressure). As water is used, it takes less and less water usage for the pressure drop to reach the cut on pressure. Your water pressure actually comes from the compressed air in the tank not from your well pump.


If you had not added air, eventually the pump would have come on as soon as you open a faucet and turned off as soon as you closed a faucet.



The tank is a storage tank, it stores water until needed. Most likely your pump alone cannot provide all the water you need at any given time. It pumps water into the tank until the air in the tank is compressed to the maximum pressure. It turns back on when the air in the tank reaches the minimum pressure.


How much water you store depends on the size of the tank. The more water you store reduces the number of times your well pump has to come on and go off. It is the number of starts and stops that determine the life of a well pump not the running time.


Replace your well tank or eventually you will be replacing the well pump also..

Until then, turn off your pump and drain your tank. Fill you tank with 40# of air pressure. Turn pump back on. That will keep you going until that air is absorbed.


This will keep you going for a short period of time without damage to the pump until you can replace the tank.


Replace with the largest tank you can afford and have room for.

Wait, how do you know the tank is bad?? !!
 

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Research - Bladder Tank Draw Down Test - to determine the condition of the tank. That draw down amount info. is usually on the tank, in the literature or can sometimes be obtained from the manufacturer.
 

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Turn off the pump switch.

Open the drain valve.
Open a cold water faucet or hose bib (that is so the water in the tank can drain out). Unless air can get in the water cannot flow out.

Think of it this way, put your straw in a soft drink, put you thumb on the end of the straw. Take the straw out of the soft drink. The soft drink does not drain out of the straw until you remove your thumb and let air into the straw.

Pressurize air in the tank to two pounds less than the cut on setting of the switch. That way the pump will cut on just before you run out of water in the tank.
In other words, if your pressure switch is set to 40 lbs, pressurize your tank to 38 lbs of air.
Turn pump back on. Let us know what happens.

The well and pump should function normally for a period of time. If the bladder is ruptured, the air you put in the tank will be absorbed by the water. Then it will take more water to reach the minimum pressure. It will take less water usage to make the pump come back on. When all the air in the tank is absorbed by the water, any use of water (even a little bit) will cause the pressure to drop to the cut on pressure. Any water pumped into the tank, even a little bit, will cause the pressure to go to high pressure and the switch to cut off.

If you were to take a steel, sealed, tank, empty except that it is filled with air, at sea level (air is more dense at sea level than in the mountains) and connect your hose to it and pump water into it. When the tank is approximately 1/3 full of water and 2/3 full of air, the compressed air would exert about 40 lbs of pressure o the water. When the tank is 2/3 full of water and 1/3 full of air, the compressed air would exert approximately 60 lbs of pressure on the water.



You can compress air, you cannot compress water.



If your air is missing due to a ruptured bladder you cannot compress the water that replaced it.

So turn off your pump switch, open the drain valve, open a faucet so tank can drain. Pressurize your tank to 38 lbs of air and turn on the well switch.

It won't last that long, maybe three of four months.
 

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Does water come out normally and strong at any faucet?

I still suspect you have partially clogged pipes or faucet/fixture innards.

I don't know how water softeners work but I think it is possible for them too to get clogged with sediment or other foreign matter and block the water flow going through.

Another crude, unscientific, inexact, and non-foolproof procedure for precharging the pressure tank, this method intended to conserve water although not save time.

Several times over the course of a Saturday or Sunday afternoon, go down and check the pressure tank:

1. Turn off the well pump breaker.

2. Measure the system pressure preferably using a tire gauge on the Schrader valve on the top of the pressure tank.

3. If you find the pressure to be lower than two PSI less than the pump turn on pressure, add more air to the pressure tank to get the pressure as close to 2 PSI less than pump turn on pressure as you can. Only if you found the pressure to be higher than pump turn off pressure should you bleed a little air out.

4. Turn the pump power back on.

If the bladder is really torn then behavior of the pump and tank presure will be erratic and somewhat unpredictable. A flap of the bladder could herniate into the outlet at the bottom of the tank and stop the water from exiting, and the pump may start before the tank pressure drops to 2 PSI less than turn on pressure. Because of this a tank with a torn bladder has to be replaced while a non-bladder tank can be used indefinitely with periodic addition of more air.
 

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I'm sorry but I skipped reading every comment on this one as it is late.

Did you drain the bladder completely before resetting it or adding.?
If not it won't work properly.
 
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