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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We had a water pipe bust that was coming our of our wall in the bathroom. Long story short, had to wait 9 days for insurance adjuster to come out & was advised not to touch anything until then. After he came I took up all the flooring in 2 bathrooms, hallway & bedroom. It smelled like mildew really bad before removal & worse after removal of flooring, where I found mold on our subfloor (OSB) and on the underside of the actual tile, engineered hardwwood/laminate and carpet.

I bought peroxide and saturated the area, waited until it stopped bubbling then I scrubbed the area with a scrub brush until the spot was no longer there. Based upon thorough research as well as talking to a contractor we know, peroxide gets down into the floor & kills mold down in whereas bleach or bleach & water mixture just kills surface mold. I did this peroxide thing throughout the house where the water damage was & fpr extra precaution I did the scrub brush to all areas that got water on them to be safe.

My question is, since I have cleaned the floor, if I bought Kilz 2 paint, which is multi purpose for surfaces including wood, and painted the areas that had visible mold spots before I cleaned them, would this keep mold from growing again or coming back? And would I need to paint anythimg over it like a top coat of latex paint?

I've cleaned my floors twice to male sure i got everything. I am allergic to mold, but used proper gear (mask, gloves, etc) when cleaning. I also used a floor dryer to help dry the floors room by room as I worked on them. We haven't heard from our homeowners yet, but we were already told OSB is resilient - which I gathered as won't be needing replaced. Any money saved wpuld be awesome bc we have probably $10,000-12,000 worth of damage/repairs.

*Note pictures of after tile was taken out/before peroxide cleaning & after I cleaned with peroxide. (Toilet needs to be taken out to get remaining tile which hadn't been yet)
Glove Wood Floor Flooring Working animal
Brown Wood Beige Road surface Flooring
 

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It doesn't look too bad.

Before applying the kilz 2, I would treat/kill the existing mold first with a mildew/mold remover, then let the floor dry really good. Put a fan on it for awhile, and run a dehumidifier. Just a suggestion.
 

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Another observation; The current (new) water staining from the busted water pipe on the osb are not too bad. However, judging by that darker colored mold/staining, water has been getting in there for awhile. Probably from the failed white caulk seal. (see pic below)

I can't really tell by the picture but If that osb is rotted, soft or flaking, the best thing to do is replace that piece with new osb imo.

Also make sure they re-apply that sealant caulk between the tub and floor.

It should be all covered by your insurance anyway. Make sure you get a reputable company to do the repairs and they will know what to do. Just a suggestion.

Thank God you have insurance. (y)(y)

Brown Wood Road surface Flooring Floor
 

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I have no idea what "OSB is resilient means"...but as JMON points out.....if the osb isn't structurally damaged, I'd hit it with a mold preventer before a stain blocker. It's kinda expensive, can't remember very well, maybe $70-100 a gallon, available at the big box stores and called something like "concorbian " or something like that.

I'm surprized the insurance company advised don't touch and left 9 day exposure...almost all insurance advises or contracts read, to mitigate any further damage immediately, and will normally pay for it (assuming its legit) whether you had prior approval or not.
 

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I do not see that as a DIY project. For future water resistance and correct repairing the present damage I think a professional contractor, with great references, is required.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Another observation; The current (new) water staining from the busted water pipe on the osb are not too bad. However, judging by that darker colored mold/staining, water has been getting in there for awhile. Probably from the failed white caulk seal. (see pic below)

I can't really tell by the picture but If that osb is rotted, soft or flaking, the best thing to do is replace that piece with new osb imo.

Also make sure they re-apply that sealant caulk between the tub and floor.

It should be all covered by your insurance anyway. Make sure you get a reputable company to do the repairs and they will know what to do. Just a suggestion.

Thank God you have insurance. (y)(y)

View attachment 664532
Thank you. This picture is after I removed the mold. Humidity in my bathroom was 70% so the nold grew faster. From what I was told, mold can be different colors & from grey to black to brown to white and shades very.
Well, what did the adjuster say?
He said he found moisture under both bathroom floors and our hallway floor. He said the insurance company will contact us. It's been 12 days since he was here (21days since pipe busted) and we haven't heard anything from them. Local agent said it could take 2months before we might hear something 😔
 

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t's been 12 days since he was here (21days since pipe busted) and we haven't heard anything from them. Local agent said it could take 2months before we might hear something 😔
Call him again tell him that's totally unacceptable, unless the insurance company of paying for you to stay someplace else there is no excuse for this! They should be able to make a decision in a day or 2 at the most. Also, you shouldn't have had to do any of the work you did, insurance should have covered all of it!
 

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I agree with the insurance company sending in a professional service to do this. It is not DIY friendly. I build back areas that have been damaged by water, but refuse to enter a house with one ounce of mold. I tell ServPro guys that my guys will walk if they see any mold. They usually do an excellent job of getting rid of it.

Insurance companies are obligated to provide this service. You should not have to lift a finger to get it back into shape.
 

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I do not see that as a DIY project. For future water resistance and correct repairing the present damage I think a professional contractor, with great references, is required.
Along those lines, decide what "success" is in this case.

As to insurance companies, they take in $2 for every $1 they pay out. They do what they want.

& if you ask them for a sworn statement, they will take off their "smiley face" mask pretty quickly.
 
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