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Need some help here.I had a new furnace installed about 3 years ago. Everything was fine until this winter. I had 2 new pvc lines ran from the furnace to the outside(fresh air and exhaust)? The problem(s) I am seeing now is that there is water dripping from one of the joints that runs through the garage(horizontal run), and I have water sitting on a joint that comes out of the unit(vertical joint) maybe 2 feet up from the unit itself. It is the same line, just dripping in 2 different spots. If you are looking at the unit,it is the line on the right side. Why is this happening and what needs to be done to correct it? Thanks in advance-Brad
 

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They were not glued properly. If the contractor warranties his work then those fittings should be replaced and glued properly. NOT an easy job to do. I would wait until mid summer when the water inside them has evaporated. Then I would take a hair dryer or heat gun on LOW and warm the joints to evaporate any possible water and slather some PVC glue on the joint. Works 95% of the time. Joint must be completely dry inside and out.
 

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The problem(s) I am seeing now is that there is water dripping from one of the joints that runs through the garage(horizontal run), and I have water sitting on a joint that comes out of the unit(vertical joint) maybe 2 feet up from the unit itself. It is the same line, just dripping in 2 different spots.
I agree with Yuri. I had the same problem with a 'high efficiency' furnace installed in one of my rental properties. It was installed before I bought the house so no warranty repairs available. Warm air from furnace mixes with cold air from outside and water condenses inside the PVC pipe. The horizontal pipe was not sloped properly and water collected inside. Joints were not glued and water dripped inside the basement. I pulled the pipe and re-set it to slope toward the exterior of the house and glued the joints. I caulked the space around the pipe where it exited the side wall of the house. Problem was solved.:)
 

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High efficiency furnaces should have the exhaust pipe drain the water back to the furnace. It can drain outside but it will make icy patches on the ground in very cold climates if it freezes there. If it gets below freezing in the garage then the exhaust pipe should be insulated with 2" Armaflex insulation or whatever size the pipe is so water does not freeeze inside it and eventually plug or restrict it. Can create pressure switch tripping problems also.
 

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They were not glued properly. If the contractor warranties his work then those fittings should be replaced and glued properly. NOT an easy job to do. I would wait until mid summer when the water inside them has evaporated. Then I would take a hair dryer or heat gun on LOW and warm the joints to evaporate any possible water and slather some PVC glue on the joint. Works 95% of the time. Joint must be completely dry inside and out.
I figured it would be something like that. Unfortunately, I had a guy do this as a side job. I will have to give him a call and see if he will fix this. Thanks for the help guys!
 

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Technically you need to put glue in the socket and on the pipe, insert AND twist to get the glue to seal properly. Perhaps he does not know this.
 

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Technically you need to put glue in the socket and on the pipe, insert AND twist to get the glue to seal properly. Perhaps he does not know this.
Gee I hope he would know this. I was told he does this for a living. I do realize there will be "errors" once in a while. It happens. Thanks again!
 

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High efficiency furnaces should have the exhaust pipe drain the water back to the furnace. It can drain outside but it will make icy patches on the ground in very cold climates if it freezes there.
I did not want the water to drain back into the furnace because I was afraid it would cause rust or damage the internal mechanisms. I am willing to trade a little ice in a flower bed for a $5000 furnace. Am I missing something? :confused1:
 

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One winter, you'll have no heat because the water will have frozen at the terminal of the pipe.

As the ice first builds up though, it will cause the furnace to burn dirty and may or may not cause sooting in it. Sooting in a 90%plus furnace is never good.
 

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Your furnace has an internal drain mechanism. The water flows back into a drain hose which goes directly into the condensate trap and out to the floor drain or cond pump. I would re-slope it B4 problems occur.
 
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