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That looks like a silver maple to me, which does not have any fall colors, the leaves just turn a drab yellow or brown. But you could take a photo of one of the leaves and that would help us identify the type of maple it is. You could also ask the landscaper who planted it for a copy of his invoice for this tree.
 

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I have had silver maples and they do have impressive fall colors, absolutely gorgeous. You can google that to see images. The tree in the original photo of this post, is not shaped like a silver maple, and does not have the leaf color (silver underside) of a silver maple. I do have a Commemoration Sugar Maple and the color has improved after being planted now for 6 years. It does take time for them to root well and be established to perform at their best. The amount of water and also night time temps your tree gets in late summer will determine alot whether the tree colors nicely. They do not grow nearly as fast as silver maples or their crosses, they have a hard wood, unlike silver maple varieties.
 

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Is there any way you can ask for a receipt or the tag that came on the tree?
Approach it as "perhaps a mistake was made" rather than accusation of intentional/neglectful wrongdoing....
 

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Commemoration Maples are hard wood and hold their leaves all winter and shed bulk of them in the spring when new leaf growth pushes the old ones off. Soft maples such as Silver Maples or others shed almost all of their leaves in the fall. My tree has leaves all winter.
 

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Commemoration Maples are hard wood and hold their leaves all winter and shed bulk of them in the spring when new leaf growth pushes the old ones off. Soft maples such as Silver Maples or others shed almost all of their leaves in the fall. My tree has leaves all winter.
Around here that would be harmful to the tree.

Lot's of snow, accumulates on those leaves, and SNAPS OFF many branches.

We got 17" of snow 3 days ago, and now there are broken branches everywhere, because the leaves had not fallen yet.


ED
 

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Just pointing out one of it's factors that may help ID it. Oak trees also hold their leaves until the next spring and are native to my area in MO. We get snow here too, and ice build up often times damages trees, sometimes toppling whole trees. I do agree that it may not be a first choice for an area that gets large amount of snow, but then neither would a soft wood tree as their wood is brittle and breaks easily.
 

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^^ That seasonal action might be typical to a certain climate or area. Around here, all deciduous trees drop the bulk of their leaves in the Fall. Oaks drop very late, sometimes after snow is on the ground, but never hold them until Spring. As mentioned, snow load on a leaf canopy can be very damaging.
 

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It depends on the species of oak. Live oaks typically drop their leaves in the late winter to early spring, depending on the local climate.
 
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