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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am planning to make a light manufacturing unit that's very energy-intensive.
Currently, I have a small unit in operation, running at ~97W (8.1A x 12V). I plan to scale this +100x.

I will get a professional electrician to do the work but I must know before acquiring a warehouse how much electrical supply is required for my operation, because each listing shows a different supply capacity, i.e. 75 amps, 500amps, 100amps, 3-phase, single phase, etc.

I will be using ~10,000W constantly for 16-hours a day, every day. 4800 kWh/month.

I'm not too knowledgeable in calculating the detailed electrical stuff (i.e. I don't know for sure how the volts and amps add up when scaling from 8.1a x 12V). When building the circuits myself, I had learned that different arrays of circuitry can provide/split amps and voltage in different ways; I used a 150W constant current transformer and some mix of series and parallel to get 12V across several lines. No idea how to scale this 100x nor do I want to attempt it.

What numbers should I look for in a warehouse listing?


Thanks.
 

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just out of curiosity - what does this "light unit" do ?
 

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Grow house?

10,000w on 240v is only 41.6 amps - about the same as an electric dryer. You should be fine almost anywhere.
 
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Is all of this at 12 volts? 120 volts? 240 volts? Single phase? Three phase?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Is all of this at 12 volts? 120 volts? 240 volts? Single phase? Three phase?
Well, no. The lights are at 12V. The other equipment, I don't know, but they are all plug and play type, with integrated drivers, just requiring at an outlet to be plugged into. Other than the lights, the only really power-consuming equipment are a refrigerator and an incubator.
I don't understand three phase and single phase even after reading about it.🤷‍♂️

I just don't want to purchase equipment, setup shop, and find out that the facility doesn't provide enough power.
 

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Watts are watts ....a measure of electrical power. To get an idea of how much power you require, add up all your wattages and divide by 240: 240 being the max voltage on a typical 120/240 residential service. If you are doing this in a commercial location, find out what size and type of electrical service is available.
 

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The light draw is only part of the equasion. That much light is going to produce heat, then there is the temp requirements for what your growing and the humans that take care of product.
Growing much of anything has an air exchange requirement. A lot has yet to be chosen before a building service can be chosen, WAG in the neighbor hood of 1000 amps 3 phase 208 volts.
Where this is located will have a lot to do with the heating and cooling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Watts are watts ....a measure of electrical power. To get an idea of how much power you require, add up all your wattages and divide by 240: 240 being the max voltage on a typical 120/240 residential service. If you are doing this in a commercial location, find out what size and type of electrical service is available.
Right. So, ideally, what number should I be looking at, if my total wattage is 9,000 - 10,000W?
 

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No disrespect intended, but if
The light draw is only part of the equasion. That much light is going to produce heat, then there is the temp requirements for what your growing and the humans that take care of product.
Growing much of anything has an air exchange requirement. A lot has yet to be chosen before a building service can be chosen, WAG in the neighbor hood of 1000 amps 3 phase 208 volts.
Where this is located will have a lot to do with the heating and cooling.
Don't be clouding the issue with facts.........
 

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I think we're going to need more data about your lights and about the service equipment in your warehouse. "10,000 watts" is a trivial load for industrial power. Even an RV plug-in is 12,000 watts. The old 60A services that they put on houses in the 1940s are 14,400 watts.
 
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