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Discussion Starter #1
I have a hundred year old house. Most of it was remodeled years ago and the plaster was replaced with drywall. There are a couple of areas where there is still plaster though - 2 closets and the stairway to the basement.

I have noticed when putting in some recessed lights that there's lath boards in the ceiling. Was it pretty standard to leave the lath when taking out plaster to put up drywall?

I want to remodel my 2 closets and redo the stairway because the plaster looks old, is cracked, and just isn't very attractive. Would I want to leave the lath boards?

I have never done this before but I have found a lot of information online and I think it could be a great learning experience for me.
 

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It is seldom left----one reason to leave it might be the different thickness of the plaster or drywall--

Some times wood furring strips are needed to bring the studs out so the drywall meets the window and door jambs properly---

It's a messy job,so plan on adding a good vacuum cleaner and face mashs to your shopping list.
 

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Just yank them out----A 2x4 or two might be needed when adding the drywall---some times the wall framing is missing the corner nailers--
 

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An old house like that used rough cut studs and there almost never perfectly flat or even across the whole wall.
Just use a piece of brick string to check to see if they need shimming, sistering, plaining.
If not your going to end up with a funky looking wall.
 

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An old house like that used rough cut studs and there almost never perfectly flat or even across the whole wall.
Just use a piece of brick string to check to see if they need shimming, sistering, plaining.
If not your going to end up with a funky looking wall.
And sometimes they shimmed the lath because the stud was really under sized and I have seen lath notched because the stud was too thick. Most times back in the old days they didn't space on 16 centers, there was no need to. The use of 4X8 sheet goods brought into play the 16 center line rule.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'm not quite knowledgeable enough on the terminology to follow what you guys are saying.

I may have to hire someone for this job if it is going to be complicated. I could however save some time by doing a lot of the demolition myself, right?

Also, is there any suggestions on what to do with the lath boards and plaster? Is this likely to have asbestos in it?

Thanks everyone. I really appreciate your feedback and guidance!
 

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You will find lead paint but seldom asbestos---

Good respirator---fans in the window---and plastic sheeting to keep the dust confined---
The demo can be expensive--doing that yourself will save you money.
 

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I
I may have to hire someone for this job if it is going to be complicated.

I could however save some time by doing a lot of the demolition myself, right?

Also, is there any suggestions on what to do with the lath boards and plaster?
not complicated, but lots of work. get friends !!!

save time = maybe, but probably not. contractors "been there, done that", so they will get it done faster, if/when they get there. but LOTS of friends will save you a lot of time.

when you must it down, it will mostly separate. plaster in the garbage. i burned my lathe.
 
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