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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was looking at my gas meter and am a bit confused. It looks like there are very small pipes connected to the meter that may be choking off the gas supply. I have 1" coming in from the city, which goes into those tiny 90掳 pipes in and out of the meter, then to a 3/4" tee to the furnace (the pipe running along the wall), then back to 1" (the pipe going into the crawlspace), which supplies the water heater, range and dryer! Shouldn't everything be 1" until the need to tee off to 3/4" for supplying the appliances? Looks to me like my 1" feed is getting cut down considerably. Unless, of course, I completely don't understand this. 馃槒
 

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I don't understand it well too. I think it's the compromise between the pressure and volumn, and it all depends on the btu your appliances need. I was thinking about natural gas generator and the first question in the research list was is there enough pressure at the generator end.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I can contact the gas company and ask them what my options are. It would be great if they'd be willing to increase output, if necessary. I'll let them know what I'm trying to do and see what they say. I'll post back here once I get an answer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Did you already buy that tankless?
Whoever sold it to you... didn't they ask about all this?
And the real Q... why does a 2BR house need one?
Good question. It's about space inside the house. It's a small house, so getting rid of the water heater frees up much needed space off the kitchen. I also have plans to convert the garage to a master bedroom with bath. So there ya go.
 

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You have more than enough gas pressure. Like stated, it is not water. We have 1" line coming to the meter, and I piped 1" into the house to a manifold and then 3/4" lines that supplies (8) fireplaces, (2) gas water heaters, (1) 16 eye gas range and (3) gas furnaces. One for each floor. It is set at only 7 pounds at the meter. That big disk looking item on the inbound line is the pressure regulator. That is what is used to adjust the pressure in the line. The size of the pipe is not "Choking" anything. This is a gas, not a liquid. Gas does not have nearly the amount of resistance as a liquid. I agree, maintain your gad lines by removing the rust, priming and painting. Also spray the valves/connections with oil. I do not see a manual shut-off valve, I would have installed one at the top of the meter.
 

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I don't understand it well too. I think it's the compromise between the pressure and volumn, and it all depends on the btu your appliances need. I was thinking about natural gas generator and the first question in the research list was is there enough pressure at the generator end.
Most gas companies won鈥檛 allow the gas line to go in the house to feed other appliances then go back out to a generator. The generator has to be fed by a tee at the meter. Depending on the size of the generator, you might have to pay the gas company to install a larger capacity meter.
 

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You have more than enough gas pressure. Like stated, it is not water. We have 1" line coming to the meter, and I piped 1" into the house to a manifold and then 3/4" lines that supplies (8) fireplaces, (2) gas water heaters, (1) 16 eye gas range and (3) gas furnaces. One for each floor. It is set at only 7 pounds at the meter. That big disk looking item on the inbound line is the pressure regulator. That is what is used to adjust the pressure in the line. The size of the pipe is not "Choking" anything. This is a gas, not a liquid. Gas does not have nearly the amount of resistance as a liquid. I agree, maintain your gad lines by removing the rust, priming and painting. Also spray the valves/connections with oil. I do not see a manual shut-off valve, I would have installed one at the top of the meter.
Natural gas pressure is measured in inches of water column. Typical residential pressure is 7 inches of water column=1/4 psi=4 ounces of pressure.
 
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