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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there,

I'm going to install "faux" board and batten wainscoting in my son's room and am running into a problem with the current trim/apron below the window. As you'll see in the pictures the apron is not as thick as wood I'll be using for my stiles/battens so I don't know the best way to handle this.

If I leave it alone it will stick out. I've seen where people bevel the top edge but I think that actually looks worse.

Any help would be appreciated.

I'm also debating if I should remove the existing base molding or not.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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I would replace the window trim molding with Another custom designed to be molding for this window, as well as a chair rail all around the room.

Which will be the top molding for the wainscoting as well.

A decent fabrication shop can make you perfect replacement molding, shaped to do this.

It might cost a bit, but you are already spending money on the wainscoting, so a custom trim will just be the "frosting" on the cake.


ED
 

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What's your budget? Are you married to the board and batten approach? You can probably find a number of beaded sheet products that look like wainscoting in a 1/4" inch thickness that would alleviate the need to to have new trim milled which could run in to some serious dollars.

I'm personally not a fan of changing trim in just one room in the house, bathroom excepted, unless you can make it look just like every other room. I guess it's a matter of taste.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What's your budget? Are you married to the board and batten approach? You can probably find a number of beaded sheet products that look like wainscoting in a 1/4" inch thickness that would alleviate the need to to have new trim milled which could run in to some serious dollars.

I'm personally not a fan of changing trim in just one room in the house, bathroom excepted, unless you can make it look just like every other room. I guess it's a matter of taste.
Don't want this to be an expensive project so my 'budget' is limited. When you refer to changing the trim in one room I assume you mean the window trim and not the board and batten (being in one room only), correct?
 

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General Contractor
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If it were me, I would. Just pull the apron off below the window sill and frame it with the same 1 by that you use for the wainscoting top rail. Simple, easy, cheap...

Follow me on Instagram: @amanteafinewoodworks
 

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Don't want this to be an expensive project so my 'budget' is limited. When you refer to changing the trim in one room I assume you mean the window trim and not the board and batten (being in one room only), correct?


Yes. I like it when all window and door casings are the same. At least on one floor.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I think I may just end up using thinner battens so that I can "get away" with not switching out my baseboard or window trim. I know this isn't the right way and it's bothering me but at the same time this is for a bedroom and it will only bother me if it's not done perfectly (i.e. removing the existing baseboard and window trim first). If this was my dining room then I would be more inclined to rip everything out first.

I was worried that thin battens would make the top rail look flimsy but if I cap it with chair rail I should be fine.

However, due to the desire to keep the molding profile thin so that it can sit flush with the current moldings, I won't be able to install a backboard and would have to go with the "faux" board and batten by simply painting the existing walls. Are there are tips/tricks to make the wall look as smooth as possible after I paint it so that it almost looks like there is a smooth backboard?

I have old plaster walls and aside from some random small humps that I will smooth out, I would call the walls "lightly textured." It's more paint roller stipple than anything else I believe. However, I would like it to look as smooth as possible for obvious reasons.

Molding is typically painted with glossy or semi-gloss paint but this will also show the wall imperfections more than a flat paint. Which should I go with?

Will I be able to get a smooth finish if I use a roller? Should I lightly brush over the paint? Again, any tips would be appreciated.

Thanks
 

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The glossier the paint the more the surface imperfections show. I like the trim to be glossier than the walls. I prefer Benjamin-Moore paint so I use eggshell on new walls and semi-gloss on new trim. If walls and trim were a beaten up I would go down a gloss level. That would give you flat on the walls and eggshell on the trim.

I think you get a great finish with a 3/8" nap roller. Technique is critical with painting if you want to achieve a uniform finish without roller marks or brush strokes. Never brush after rolling. There should be some tutorials on the web about painting technique.
 

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Again, I say just pull the apron off under the window and trim it with your batten boards. The only time you would notice a difference is if you could see both styles of trim at the same time. If the door isn't visible when you look at the window, you will never know the difference unless you look for it.

Follow me on Instagram:
"@amanteafinewoodworks"
 
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