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Caution! Girl working
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, all!
The house is made of plasticrete block (it's sort of like concrete) with a stamped veneer that has a brick pattern and has been painted several times in it's 60+ years.

The anchors that hold up the veneer are rusting, causing large orange streaks here and there on the exterior. In some places, the anchors are actually working themselves out. I believe this is occurring because the temperature difference between the inside (block) and the outside (veneer) is creating a little pocket of moisture in between the two and there is no place for it to weep out (other than into the basement walls, which it does). There's no ledge or anything...the block walls go from the basement floor straight up to the roof.

The prior owner painted over old paint, cracks and all, and it looks terrible but I cannot power-wash it or anything because it's probably lead paint.

Before the rusting anchor problem gets any worse, do you think that hanging vinyl siding (glue/anchor fir strips, insulate in between, and hang insulated vinyl), would help? Or, is there some other product that would be better (and, hopefully, easier) to install directly over the veneer?

Thank you :confused1:
 

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www.doors4home.com
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I cannot recommend putting something over that type of material.

I could recommend taking down the old and tired material that could be potentially hazardous.

Covering up a problem leads to future problems.

Think about it.

Jason
 

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Posting some photos would help.
 

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Caution! Girl working
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Lead abatement is a big issue here in Connecticut. As of this year, contractors have to take a lengthy class and can be fined an EXTRAORDINARY amount of money if they do not remove lead properly from a home. This, obviously, makes the process significantly more expensive and out-of-reach of my bank account, so I'd rather leave it undisturbed and cover it up. Especially since the neighbor works for the town board.

Taking off the veneer would be wonderful, but, way out of my price range, unfortunately.
 

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Lead abatement is a big issue here in Connecticut. As of this year, contractors have to take a lengthy class and can be fined an EXTRAORDINARY amount of money if they do not remove lead properly from a home. This, obviously, makes the process significantly more expensive and out-of-reach of my bank account, so I'd rather leave it undisturbed and cover it up. Especially since the neighbor works for the town board.

Taking off the veneer would be wonderful, but, way out of my price range, unfortunately.
The lead issue is a Federal one. Violations are $37,500. per infringement.
Failure to seal the area-Fine
Failure to wrap properly-Fine
Failure to dispose of properly-Fine
Failure to clean up properly-Fine
One job, $150,000 in fines.
If he's not certified...well you know what happens.
 

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Tileguy
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More REE-DICK-LESS BS from our government. What a crock!

I was aware of the laws and the requirements and certification but I choose not to participate. Never thought about power washing being a problem unless you crawl around on your belly afterward and lick up all the chips.:)
 

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Caution! Girl working
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
yummy

While I don't plan to lick up the chips (although I hear they are yummy), my concern is knocking tiny chips off with a power washer that float around once they are dry. I'm probably overreacting but, after hearing horror stories from other homeowners, it's not even worth trying. :wink:
 

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All this over "probably lead paint". Just get it tested and go from there once you know what you are deling with.

Those block were probably made by Plasticrete, which was the major supplier in CT, NE and even into NYC. From the description, could be a veneer, but likely, the block is not quiet that old and there is no veneer. There were also some strange configurations of different materials that were used. In any event, the rust you may be seeing could be from the joint reinforcement that was not placed with the proper cover, but with deferred maintenance any corrosion is possible.

It is unlikely the original (or first coat) had lead in it because it was probably a masonry paint or coating. Take sample that include all the layers and find out if there is any need for concern.

Instead of licking up the chips with wet/dry vacuum, put them in a suitable container and dispose of the the small amount and get a receipt for neighbors. Certainly better than let Mother Nature deteriorate the surface and blow it everywhere if there is a significant amount. - It is all relative and common sense.

Dick
 

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Caution! Girl working
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well I'll be!

Dick,
Do you mean you actually know what Plasticrete is!! I have done a lot of research but there are few people who have ever heard of it. That is awesome :)

You are right, I should have the paint tested first. The house was built in the late 40s / early 50s, but it definitely has a veneer...water has cracked it (over decades, probably) on a small corner and it's clearly different from the block foundation material underneath, which, fortunately, remains perfectly intact.

And, yes, neglect has caused a lot of damage in this little house, which I bought just over a year ago. So sad because a lot of things could have been avoided if someone had cared. I knew about all of the issues, so the price was right, and each issue is getting properly fixed. The exterior and insulation options are the last main things.
 

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ADaniLion -

The first step is to find out the construction and the materials you are concerned about.

Yes, I know of the history of the company and I knew the President (and his sons) plus many people that were influential in the business and national associations. They were the dominant concrete masonry producer (many different plants) in NE and the supplier of the Century City/Towers (designed by architect Paul Rudolph) just off I95 in NYC area. They were great promoters and made good products, but had no control over the use of them.

They may have also made the veneer materials that were veneered over the concrete block wall since customer loyalty was very important for suppliers and contractors, especially if you were Italian or union associated, which was very common in CT.

Dick
 

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Caution! Girl working
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
WOW! That's cool. This house was built, I'm told, by Plasticrete's Chief Financial Officer at the time. I'm still researching how to best deal with the exterior...I'll post some photos when my home computer's set up again and get some advise. :)
 
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