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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just learning about the differences between these two. Vinyl plank seems to make more sense due to its water proof ability which would make sense as it is for a kitchen/living room combo.

There is direct sun through sliding doors and windows, but it is climate controlled. I understand it can deform from the heat such as sun.

What are people’s preferences. Which types of vinyl hold up best to direct sun but look as close to regular laminate as much as possible?




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We will have a similar project like you with LR, DR, kitchen open floor plan. I’ve put it on hold until spring but we looked at Kraus Rustic Estate LVP. It’s approved for radiant floor heat up to 30 Celsius. We have kitchen window and at DR, a door with a side light south facing. My flooring guy said this would be a good choice even with sunlight coming in. Our neighbour put this brand but the glue down type in their house so we will have the opportunity to see it 4 months later.


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I love luxury vinyl planking. Just redid my whole first floor with it. So far, no issues. I would recommend, that if you are concerned about UV/sunlight doing damage to simply have some tint applied to your windows. This will reduce a lot of the UV and potential sun damage. Also, upgrade your window blinds/shades if possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
On that note - can you use the same underlay
for vinyl laminate flooring as you would use for conventional engineered hardwood? The guy at Home Depot said no way but not sure of the logic. Seems like a good base. It’s black in colour and almost like a foam/rubber.


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Every type of vinyl plank has its own set of rules to follow regarding underlayment. Some require it, some do not. I'm only guessing here, but the foam/rubber underlayment may impede the "floating" nature of luxury vinyl. I know the last version of LV that I installed in my own home, required NO UNDERLAYMENT.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Every type of vinyl plank has its own set of rules to follow regarding underlayment. Some require it, some do not. I'm only guessing here, but the foam/rubber underlayment may impede the "floating" nature of luxury vinyl. I know the last version of LV that I installed in my own home, required NO UNDERLAYMENT.


Good to know. I like the planks that you can do no underlayment. That said the authoritarian rules of the condo apply. I think they may require 72 (whatever the measurement is) rating


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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Looking at this photo again of the underlay I currently have ... and yes it is dry now, I don’t see how this won’t work with vinyl plank 6mm flooring. It appears to be rubber not foam as I had originally thought. Am I really going to have to do new underlayment?






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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Okay have it narrowed down to Mannington Adura Max - or Renissance EnCore. Anyway have experience with other of these brands both sold by the same company?

I did a scratch test beside some top of the road box store lvp samples and they seems to hold
Up a bit better.




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