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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am trying to help my mom fix up an old window candolier, very very similar to the attached image.

I took the meter to the sockets that wouldn't light and there's no voltage across them, so I pulled them out; they look burned. So I'm assuming they are done.

My question is - is there anywhere to source replacement C7 sockets that anyone knows of? All I've found are sockets for vintage string lights which have a different profile and won't fit down inside the candle.

Otherwise, I was thinking of maybe just buying an old one and salvaging it for parts. But I wasn't sure if I could actually take a socket like this off without breaking it.

Anyone out there mess with this older stuff before?

Really it looks like I can buy a whole replacement on ebay for $25 or less, but.. you know.. it's fun to fix it if I can do it for $5....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Didn't even occur to me that I could rip that metal stuff off.

But, I can't tell from those what the outer diameter is. You think it'll fit?
 

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That is only one of many sockets that will work for your bulbs.
How many will actually work in your fixture without modification of the socket or fixture is another question.
Best thing to do is remove one of the non-working sockets and take it with you to the store.

FYI, the C7 is describing the bulb shape/size. The base is an e12 or candelabra base. Some of the guys in a big box store or hardware store may not understand a reference to a C7 socket.
 

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Many of the older candoliers have press in thin metal socket shells. The serrated edge of the shell is such that is is much harder to extract the shell compared with pressing it in during factory assembly maybe 30 years ago.

I have had limited success removing these socket shells by inserting a chopstick up the candle and hitting with a hammer. Provided you get the shell out without squashing it, you might be able to make repairs without having to buy a new socket shell.

The more modern candoliers have plastic sockets molded into the candle tops with a metal strip contact along the side and the usual metal contact at the bottom.

One cause of problems is that a blob of solder used to attach the wire to the socket shell, became brittle and cracked, or parts corroded because the wrong kind of solder was used.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
...The more modern candoliers have plastic sockets molded into the candle tops with a metal strip contact along the side and the usual metal contact at the bottom.
The one I have is a plastic socket, but it appears to just clamp onto the cord as it runs past.

I'm guessing though I can use a newer socket and just splice the leads into the cord as I need to.
 

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Yes you can use a newer socket and splice the leads into the existing wires.

Be sure that the lead going to the bottom contact connects to the existing wire that goes to the slightly smaller plug prong.

In any event, non-original components will cause the Underwriters Labs or other rating to be lost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So, I ordered some candelabra sockets, but the outer diameter of the socket is too big to actually fit down inside the candle body. The ones I got seem to be a decent quality, and fairly small, but just not small enough...

Anyone have idea where I can source narrower ones? I hate to just throw this thing out.
 
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